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An investigation of Styal Mill and the textile industry in early Nineteenth century England

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Introduction

Assignment One History Around US An investigation of Styal Mill and the textile industry in early Nineteenth century England "A visit to Styal Mill is the best way to learn about living and working conditions in textile mills in England in the early Nineteenth century" Do you agree with this statement? Give reasons for your answer. During the eighteenth century there was an incredible event that changed the way in which people work even today. This is called the Industrial Revolution. This is where the main industry changed from Domestic to industrial. As the domestic industry was dying out there became growth of many factories. With every factory this brought workers, and the workers needed accommodation close to the factories. And with the growth of factories all around England, mainly in the North, towns became to grow. Although all factories were not in towns, there were many in the country. These mills were usually built by fast flowing rivers, as at this time this was the only way to produce enough power, cheap enough to make a profit, to power a mill. One of these country mills was called Styal Mill; this was one of the first water powered cotton weaving mills. ...read more.

Middle

When one of many machines was turned on as an example of the density of noise the worker worked in, it was extremely loud, and I couldn't even imagine the noise if all the machines were switched on. According to my research many workers taught themselves how to lip-read, so that during work hours they could enjoy convocations with other employees. The Apprentice house was built in order to accommodate the orphan children. Approximately 100 children lived in the apprentice house, and many more of them were female rather than male as they were better workers. The superintendents of the house were called Mr and Mrs Shorecroft. These superintendents were employed merely to watch over the children, and make sure no child was out of order. Within the apprentice house were the facilities to shelter the children and care for the children with their very own private doctor on hand. Some lucky boys got the opportunity to have a basic education. There was a room for girls and a room for boys. Both rooms were quite small and full of small beds for them to sleep in. ...read more.

Conclusion

He also used leeches to suck the sickness out of the child through the blood. From the sound of Styal it sounds like a pleasant place to live and work, but not every mill was like this. The mills based in towns were mostly nothing like this at all. They were very different. Most mills had no education for the children and the punishments were barbaric. Some children had weights attached to their nose and ears if they arrived late. Some children were strapped by the overseer to work harder. "They are about a foot and a half long and there is a stick at the end; and they beat with is cut into five or six thongs." Mark Best, an overseer, describes the straps. The safety of the children was not very good either, it wasn't perfect in Styal but there was room for improvement. "She was caught by her apron, which wrapped around the shaft. She was whirled around and repeatedly forced between the shaft and the carding engine. (Her right leg was found some distance away.)" Leonard Horner, a factory inspector, describes what happened to a young girl in a textile factory. The diet of the children in a mill in Nottinghamshire is very different to that of Styal ...read more.

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