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An Investigation to see whether the halo effect is present when rating personality traits of 'attractive' and 'unattractive' people.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

An Investigation to see whether the halo effect is present when rating personality traits of 'attractive' and 'unattractive' people. Contents Page. Abstract- Page 1 Introduction- Pages 2-3 Method- Pages 4-6 Procedure- Page 7 Results- Page 8 Discussion- Pages 9-10 Appendix- Page 11 Condition 1- Page 12 Condition 2- Page 13 Raw Data- Page 14 Results- Page 15 Wilcoxon Test- Page 16 Brief- Page 17 Standardised Instructions- Page 18 Debrief- Page 19 References- Page 20 Abstract. The 'halo effect' refers to the subjective bias of which an individual see's another physically attractive person as having positive personality traits whereas they see an unattractive person as having undesirable personality traits. The aim of the investigation was to see whether the halo effect is present when rating personality traits of 'attractive' and 'unattractive' people. The hypothesis of the investigation was 'There will be a significant difference in the rating of personality traits of 'attractive' and 'unattractive' pictures of two individuals. The research method for the investigation was experimental using repeated measures design as this was more time efficient. The sampling method used was opportunity sampling whereby 10 pupils from Skipton Girls' High School took part in the investigation. Results of this investigation support the experimental hypothesis as there was a significant difference in the rating of personality traits of 'attractive' and 'unattractive' people. The mean in Condition 1 (attractive then unattractive) is 7.3 whereas in Condition 2 (unattractive then attractive) it is 4.2, as a result of these and other statistical methods the hypothesis was accepted as correct. The results of the wilcoxon test were that the critical value of T at p<0.01 is 5 (n=10), the observed value of T is 0 which is less than the critical value therefore the findings are significant with a 1% probability of chance proving the significance of the results. The conclusion of the investigation was to accept the experimental hypothesis. ...read more.

Middle

Copies of the brief and debrief can be found in the Appendix. Participants -The target population for this investigation was Year 12 and 13 students in sixth form at Skipton Girls High School, Skipton, North Yorkshire. 10 Year 12 and 13 participants were used, all of these aged between 16 and 18 years. The sampling method that was used was opportunity sampling, as it was easier to find participants of those year groups, and also those that did not or do not study A Level Psychology. Participants fitting this description were asked if they would like to take part in a short investigation and if they said yes were asked to come to the room S1 at a certain time. By using this sampling method however it was quite difficult to find participants as they firstly had to be free at the time stated and secondly had to not study Psychology, this lowered my chances of possible participants. Apparatus/Materials- The selection of materials were chosen previously based on a hand out of 5 attractive people and 5 unattractive people given to 10 individuals, 5 individuals getting the 5 attractive pictures and 5 getting the pictures of 5 unattractive people to rate on a scale of 1 to 10 of attractiveness, one being the lowest and 10 being the highest. The results of this short exercise were then averaged out and the most attractive picture and the least attractive picture were then chosen to be used in my investigation. As a result of doing this experimenter bias is eliminated due to the fact that individuals with nothing to do with the investigation carried out this exercise. The pictures used in the investigation are featured in the Appendix. The adjectives chosen were based on previous research into the 'halo effect' regarding attractive people. The adjectives chosen were successful, trustworthy, sociable, reliable and happy. In the investigation a stopwatch on a Sony Ericsson W810i was used to give the participants the set amount of time allocated for the investigation, the allocated time was 1 minute for all participants to complete the task. ...read more.

Conclusion

If you would not like to participate in this investigation you have the right to withdraw, now or at any time throughout just tell me and your results will be discarded. All results are kept entirely confidential. Does anyone have any questions before I read the instructions or would anyone not like to participate in this investigation? Standardised Instructions. I am going to give you all a picture of an individual and you will have exactly a minute to rate this person on 5 different personality traits, 1 being the lowest score and 10 being the highest. After this minute I will then collect in these pictures and give you another, which you will have another minute to do the same with. After you have done this I will tell you all about my investigation and answer any questions you may have. You are reminded that you have the right to withdraw, now or at any time throughout the investigation and your results will be discarded. Does anyone have any questions before we begin? Debrief. Thank you for taking part in my investigation, I will now tell you the aim of it and answer any questions you may have. The aim of the investigation was to see if the halo effect is present when rating pictures of attractive and unattractive individuals. The halo effect is a subjective bias whereby an individual associates somebody with positive personality traits purely due to the fact they they are attractive, the same applying to unattractive. As you may have noticed there was a picture of an attractive individual and an unattractive individual and I asked you all to rate these using 5 adjectives, after analysing my results I expect to find that there will be a significant difference in the rating of the attractive picture to the unattractive picture. Does anybody have any questions in regards to my investigation? You are reminded once more that you have the right to withdraw your results from this investigation and they will be discarded. ...read more.

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