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Challenging Behaviour

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Introduction

Challenging Behaviour 1(a). Four types of challenging behaviour in my workplace / client group are as follows: * The use of inappropriate language such as swearing at staff or other clients. This can come from clients becoming frustrated at their lack of communication skills. This can often occur in a place or situation where such behaviour would seem out of place or proportion. * The withdrawal or disengagement from a care plan or support arrangements. A lack of or too much choice in an individual's life can cause this. Over or under stimulation can also be a factor in these cases. * Stripping of clothes in order to gain any form of attention whether it is positive or negative. This often comes as a result of isolation that may have been experienced in institutions or indeed the client's own home. * The unwillingness to show respect for another's personal space or circumstances. This is again a common factor with clients who may have been isolated and wish to seek attention or just feel the need to be with others without considering their feelings or circumstances. (b). Internal factors such as poor communication levels can result in challenging behaviour. This is due to the individual being unable to express their thoughts or feelings in any other way. Adverse effects of medication can also be a cause of challenging behaviour resulting in reactions and side effects to new or the wrong medication being taken. ...read more.

Middle

I have also worked with another client who will from time to time strip her clothes off in inappropriate places. She does this as a result of many years of solitude spent in an institution. By taking off her clothes she will gain attention even though it is negative. As a response any member of the care team who has to deal with this will remove her from the situation right away to avoid any fuss being made over her and causing a scene in front of other clients. By informing her in an assertive tone of voice that this behaviour is inappropriate and informing her she is perfectly within her rights to do it in her own room, the situation is dissolved with a minimum of fuss. Her right to do as she wishes is also protected however it is pointed out that she has the responsibility to do it in her own space without upsetting others. 3. (A) Two appropriate skills for dealing with challenging behaviour would be as follows: Use of the appropriate verbal communications. This can be in the form of defusing any challenging situations by remaining calm and attempting to distract the client from the cause or reason of the behaviour. This can be very effective as the client may feel that a carer is willing to listen and take into account the reason for the behaviour and act upon it. ...read more.

Conclusion

There are however negative aspects to the relating approach with client's becoming dependant on one particular carer, creating inconsistency within the care setting. It is also the case that not all people have the same ability to build relationships or indeed to maintain them. All interventions should be needs based and particular to the circumstances. It is vital that carers are aware that what works for one may not work for another. (Wright 2002) 4. When I started out in care work I had no real concept of what challenging behaviour was or meant. I have learned along the way however that it can and does have many forms and different interpretations. I have a colleague who states that, "he cant help it, he is a really nice guy" as a response to the behaviour of one particular client. This may be true, however the behaviour in question is still a challenge and has to be addressed accordingly. I have also read with interest that these forms of behaviour are mainly from clients with learning disabilities, which I would argue is untrue. Challenging behaviour comes in many forms and from many different areas of society. By adopting the correct approach in a particular situation we are more likely to be able to respond to such behaviours. I have learned that by addressing all cases on an individual basis success is more likely to be achieved, creating a better, safer environment for all concerned. ...read more.

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