• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Death of a Salesman. Dreams play an important role in unfolding characteristics and are used as themes and structure within the story. Willy pursues the "American dream" but to no avail and we see how he reacts to this through his confusion

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Post 1914 Drama Death of a Salesman. Dreams play an important role in unfolding characteristics and are used as themes and structure within the story. Willy pursues the "American dream" but to no avail and we see how he reacts to this through his confusion between reality and dreams. We see how these dreams have come to haunt Willy (e.g. Ben's success) and although these dreams haunt Willy, one person's nightmare can be another person's dream, Biff's dreams are the opposite of Willy's dreams yet both dreams are noble aspirations. Miller Uses dreams to show how the characters feel about each other are and how not achieving them has led to serious faults within the relationships, between Biff and Willy. We can see that during a dream "Willy: (kisses BIFF) wait till I tell this in Boston" whilst in reality "Biff: why does dad always mock me" Now we can see how negative Biff and Willy have become towards each other, from loving each other dearly because of the harm caused by dreams. ...read more.

Middle

This creates pity for Willy because he is in such disillusionment that we understand that his life has become so confusing for him "Biff: what the hell is wrong with him?" "Linda: you called him crazy" we see how Willy is worthy of pity from us because his own son has called him crazy. Miller makes it seem as though because of the way Willy's sons have neglected him, that Willy is in his own world and it is as if dreams are his last resort, for a dream to come true because you need to have a dream for it to be realised. Willy continues to dream as a last resort for hope "Willy: I see it like a diamond". When Willy is talking to Ben about grasping his future, he has a dream which he wants to grasp. Miller uses the diamond as a metaphor for his dream "shining in the dark" and the dark represents how unlikely it is for his dream to come true. ...read more.

Conclusion

Willy sees the economic and urban lifestyles, working hard and being liked, as important, whilst as Biff contrasts this, he is portrayed as rural and natural which shows that characters within the dreams build details of characters outside the dreams, indicating clashes between dreams that as Biffs dreams are almost the antithesis of Willy's dreams. There is no one ideal "American Dream" and each person needs to aspire to what they feel is best for them. Dreams can have a variety of different effects, Willy's dreams lead to his demise, Ben's dreams lead to success, and with this story I feel that Miller is trying to tell the audience that you can have dreams but you cannot always rely on them to come true. If they don't then you shouldn't dwell on the past, what's done has been done and you should focus on your future which remains ahead of you. You might find yourself way "out there in the blue, riding on a smile and a shoeshine. And when they start not smiling back - that's an earthquake. A salesman has got to dream. It comes with the territory." ?? ?? ?? ?? By Michael Brown 1 English literature coursework ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Physiological Psychology section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Physiological Psychology essays

  1. Why do we dream?

    Always make sure you know what the deadline is, and work backwards from it. Your first job should be to look at your timetable and see where you can fit the jobs in. In other words, organise yourself. THEORIES OF DREAMING: WHY DO WE DREAM?

  2. Discuss the importance of dreams in the play

    The American Dream features in the play but not informing the audience that The American Dream is what it is partly focusing on. On page 82, Biff says "We've been talking in a dream for fifteen years." First of all the reader thinks he's saying he's been taking in the

  1. The major theme of Death of a Salesman, about all else, is about Dreams ...

    The one member of the Lohman family is far from the truth. The one member of the Lohman family that has any sense of reality is Willy's wife, Linda Lohman. Linda tries to keep everything in perspective, and has a decent sense of reality even when her husband drills the

  2. War Story

    Am I ever going to see them again? Tears fill my eyes; I wake from my daze as the salty tears start to hit my dry, chapped lips. For hours I pace the field, I know that I need to rest, I crave to dream of my family, they're my only encouraging thought at the moment.

  1. 'My Dreams, My Clouds, Your World' - a short story

    I wanted to tell them that I am here just to make some money, the legal way. I wanted to earn a lot of money and then I would go back to my roots. I'll go back to where money matters.

  2. Stress in the Workplace : Why Is it Important to Deal with It?

    In spite of it's ability to fracture working lives, anxiety was designed to help human survival. It is a fundamental physiological device within the nervous system that primes us for action in the face of danger. Without this response we would not have the impetus to react instantly and slam our foot on the brake.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work