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Deprivation implies that separation has entailed some bond disruption. It is separation plus the disruption or loss of attachments.

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Introduction

Psychology - Exam Questions 4a.Deprivation implies that separation has entailed some bond disruption. It is separation plus the disruption or loss of attachments. Privation refers to the situation where no attachments have ever been formed. It may occur as a result of institutionalized care. 4b.Another way to study privation is to consider the effects of institutionalization, in situations where infants have never had the opportunity to form any attachments. The first study that represents institutionalization, that I will be looking at is a study carried out by Skodak and Skeels. In this study, they compared the development of one group orphans raised in a home for children who were mentally retarded (where women gave attention to them) ...read more.

Middle

By the age of four, twenty four children had been adopted, fifteen had gone to their natural homes, and the rest remained in the institution. The children were assessed at ages 4, 8 and 16. In the final analysis, it was found that the adopted children generally had close attachments to their parents and good family relationships, but was not for children who were back in their natural homes. This is because the parent's probably had problems in the first place. The conclusion was that the two ex-institution groups, adopted and restored, differed within their family relationships. However, there were similarities between the two groups outside the family, when interacting with other adult's and peers. ...read more.

Conclusion

The mothers were interviewed and the infants were observed at home and, where possible, in day care. The findings showed that those infants with extensive day care experience did not differ from infants without day care in terms of the distress they exhibited during separations from their mother in the strange situation, this suggests that the day care experience had no immediate effects on attachment. Also, the study did not find any difference in terms of the age of the infants when they first started day care, the amount of day care, or the type of day care. However, they did find effects in relation to maternal sensitivity or responsiveness. Infants were less likely to be secure when low maternal sensitivity or responsiveness was combined with poor quality childcare, or more than one care arrangement. In other words, a build up of negative factors did create problems. ...read more.

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