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Describe and evaluate one psychological perspective on personality

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Introduction

Describe and evaluate one psychological perspective on personality By Kendra Pinder There are numerous Psychoanalysts within the academic world, each with their own theory, research and belief in various aspects of human behaviour, the causes and symptoms and in some cases the cure. This essay will be focusing upon Freud, Erikson and Kelly. As with Freud, Erikson agrees that our personalities are made up of three basic elements, the Id, Ego and Superego. But unlike Freud, Erikson Believed that the Ego was not simply a subjective part of a person's personality that simply carried out an action or repressed an action suggested by the other two parts. To Erikson the Ego is the most important system of the three, as conscious decisions are made through the ego and that would have a positive or negative affect on our development and upon our own personalities. ...read more.

Middle

Unlike Freud who believes that our personalities are fixed after our young teens by previous experiences, and fixations we form during those stages. Erikson understands that because our social interaction changes, so does our environment change and we have to deal with, and adapt. The choices we make via the ego will have a positive or negative affect on the outcome throughout each stage. And because of our reliance upon others throughout our lives, their reaction and treatment of us also has a negative and a positive impact. Erikson believed that we not only move through these psychosocial stages, but we can revisit them, and by understanding various negatives we would associate with that stage. We can build upon these and apply building blocks that allow us to move on more positively from them. With knowledge and understanding about ourselves, and the impact that not only others have had, but still have upon our lives. ...read more.

Conclusion

Also add to this the thoughts and theories of George Kelly, another academic I tend to lean towards and favour above others I have learnt so far. Kelly did not believe that an individual's personality and behaviour traits were fixed. He was very much of the opinion that each individual is constantly learning, finding out new ways to understand the world around them and there selves. Kelly understood that each and every one of us exists within our own realities. And he believed that by understanding other's views of an individual's reality, and what they perceive to be true. Each person certainly can change there traits, and in doing so change there behaviour etc. My preference is certainly more with Erikson, and to be honest this essay has been quite difficult as all three dip in and out of each others base theories. The expanded Freudian theory by Erikson certainly seems the most logical and more applicable so far. ...read more.

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