• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Describe the effects of the Blitz on everyday life in Britain

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Describe the effects of the Blitz on everyday life in Britain Civilians were assigned specific shops to purchase items. There were restrictions as to buying things such as food, fuel, clothing, books, toys and cosmetics because of the limited production. This was because the Germans targeted production areas. Food was rationed therefore civilians were encouraged to grow fruits and vegetables in their wartime garden. It was usually rich in fat and carbohydrates and always homemade. There was no phones, cars or central heating to be used. The radio was essential to learn how to prepare for attacks. Old pots and pans were donated from the civilians to make spitfires although they sometimes weren't used, people wanted to contribute to the war effort. ...read more.

Middle

The bombing on cities was anticipated on 1939. Evacuated children returned but suddenly the bombs dropped in 1940 and many died. Many families were separated for safety purposes. People were scared of gas attacks. It was compulsory to carry a gasmask because the gas would cause death. The smell of rubber and disinfectant made people sick. Instruction leaflets were distributed incase of a gas attack. It was an offense not to wear a gas mask. Children's gas masks had pictures so they wouldn't be scared. If the adult died, the baby died too. The government told civilians not to use light at night (blackout) ...read more.

Conclusion

Parents were pressurized to send their children away because the government feared that child casualties would decrease morale. Children were labeled to their destination. Evacuations began on 1st September 1939 and over one million evacuees left London by train. A total of 1,250,000 people were evacuated. Evacuation areas, Neutral areas and reception areas were formed. Transport was used to send vulnerable people to these areas. Children under five followed their mothers. Some children were enthusiastic and some were distressed. Social effects were most felt because their entire daily routine was drastically changed. People lived in fear and they had to take many safety precautions. Families were split up and children were evacuated. The social effects of the blitz could have changed people's morale but the government used many cunning ways to keep spirits high. ?? ?? ?? ?? Page 1 of 2 ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Developmental Psychology section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month
  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work