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Describe the effects of the Blitz on everyday life in Britain.

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Introduction

Describe the effects of the Blitz on everyday life in Britain The Blitz was a devastating and horrifying event in history, which began in September 1940 and lasted until November. During the Blitz, everyday life in Britain was radically influenced due to the many restrictions and disruption that were imposed upon it. Blackouts were a major part of these disruptions, as when lights were out, streetlights off, and car headlights off, nothing could be seen. This caused many accidents and deaths for motorists and pedestrians, and by the end of 1939 more that 1500 people had died due accidents during the blackouts. ...read more.

Middle

This type of activity widened the gap between the upper and lower classes, as it was the rich that were able to leave the cities for safer areas, whilst the poor had to remain to face the terror of bombing raids in the cramped underground stations that served as air raid shelters. Between 1st and 3rd September 1940, 1,500,000 mothers, children and babies were evactaed from the industrial and built-up areas and sent to the countryside, to ensure their safety during the bombing. Small rural towns and villages were put under enormous strain, as local resources were unprepared and unable to cope with the sudden arrival of such vast numbers of people. ...read more.

Conclusion

However, for those that were evacuated, with the men away at war, and the children evacuated, family life as they had known it was completely ripped apart. The biggest effect that the blitz had on everyday life in Britain was the destruction of property, and more importantly, the loss of human life, with nearly 25,000 people killed during the raids. This, together with the pain and disruption of evacuation had an enormous psychological impact of the British people. One can only imagine the mental anguish of losing your home, your children, and wondering whether or not you would survive another night. It was this psychological warfare that that was so effective, and seriously threatened the morale of the British. ...read more.

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