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Developing Talk with Pupils across the Core Curriculum

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Introduction

Developing Talk with Pupils across the Core Curriculum With specific reference to sessions in each Core Curriculum area which you either taught or observed, consider how you, the teacher or other adults, used Talk to gain access to pupils' thinking and to enhance the teaching of English, Mathematics, Science and ICT. To introduce this assignment it is crucial to highlight the importance of developing talk for children's learning. Language is an essential part of learning and plays a fundamental role within the classroom. Before children develop their ideas in a written format they are able to express the information the wish to convey orally. Which is why in my opinion, children must be given the opportunity to discuss and share ideas with the teacher and the rest of the class. The children also benefit from discussion and interaction with each other as it aids creativity and imagination that may help other children develop their ideas further. Every child is unique and brings with them a whole range of different experiences for example, in literacy when asked to describe a dog; every child will have their own image of a dog which may be based on a home experience. Allowing the children to further discuss their ideas within a group will assist learning tremendously as they are able to build on their prior knowledge. Children forming friendship groups at school also depend on talk. Children who are able to express themselves and their ideas clearly are often more confident and their attitude towards learning is also more positive than children who are quiet or withdrawn. The National Curriculum offers little guidance on the development of spoken English in my opinion. I read through the document to find some information to aid teachers teaching talk with children with English as an additional language. I believe that this information is relevant to all children. The National Curriculum also states that "In speaking, pupils should be taught to use language precisely and cogently." ...read more.

Middle

I gave them enough time to practise in pair and talk about ways they could improve the dramatisation of the poem. I feel that allowing them to first work in pairs gave them more confidence when performing to the rest of the class. I was extremely pleased with this lesson as all the children enjoyed the activity and shared their poems with each other. During the plenary, I asked the children to explain why they chose to speak in a certain way and they offered suitable reasoning for their decisions. My role in this activity was to be encouraging to all the pupils especially those who were beginning to have the confidence to talk to the class, even though it was pre-rehearsed. I believe a teacher is always modelling appropriate language and behaviour within a class so they must be positive and caring in any situation. "There is nothing worse than saying that a child's tentatively spoken words are wrong, but they may need help to improve the way they express themselves." (ibid, pg 125) During this year block placement I did not observe any shared or guided reading sessions, although the teacher did have the text to cater for it in the classroom. However, I did observe many shared and guided sessions last year in KS1. Children were grouped by ability and text were appropriate. The children took turns to read aloud a small section of the text. We first discussed the title of the book and shared our ideas of what we thought the book was about and by looking at the illustrations we also talked about who the book was targeted towards e.g. boys, infants etc. The blurb also offered just enough information to gain an understanding of the text and I asked the children if they think they would enjoy the book and offer an explanation why. This interaction and discussion between the group and teacher is more effective than independent reading in my opinion. ...read more.

Conclusion

I have also learned that it useless to expect children to formulate good ideas if they are not given appropriate time to do so. However, I feel that teachers are pressured to produce written evidence for the work their class children carry out especially in the Core subjects, this results in less time being dedicated to developing talk. Due to new Government guidance teachers may have the support they have needed to develop children in this area. Biblography Alexander, R, Available on www.robinalexander.org.uk/docs/nyorks_EVAL_REP_03.pdf, [Accessed on 3 March 2006] Behabviour4Learning, Available on www.behaviour4learning.ac.uk/viewArticle.aspx?contentId=10399, [Accessed on 1 March 2006] Crystal, D. (2003), The Cambridge Encyclopedia of the English Language, Cambridge, University Press. Davenport, G C. (1994), An introduction to Child Development, London, Collins. Hopkins, C. et al. ((2004), Understanding Primary Mathematics, London, David Fulton Publishers Ltd. Jarvis, P et al. (2003), The theory and practice of Learning: 2nd ed, London, Kogan Page Ltd. Loveless, A. Dore, B. (2002), ICT in the Primary School, Buckingham, Open University Press. Nate, Available on www.nate,org.uk, [Accessed on 3 March 2006] Medwell, J. et al. (2004), Primary English Teaching Theory and Practice: 2nd ed, Exeter, Learning Matters Ltd Mercer, et al. (2004), Reasoning as a Scientist: Ways of Helping Children to use Language to Learn Science, 30,359-377, BREI. Mooney, c. et al, (2004), Primary Mathematics Teaching Theory and Practice: 2nd ed, Exeter, Learning Matters Ltd. QCA (ed) (2003), New Perspectives on Spoken English in the Classroom: Discussion Papers, London. Riper, V & Butler. (1955), Speech in the Elementary Classroom, New York, Harper & Row Publishers. Thompson, I.(2003), Enhancing Primary Mathematics Teaching, Glasgow, Open University Press. Tough, J. (1976), Listening to Children Talking, London, Robert MacLehose and Company Ltd. Whitehead, M R. (1997), Language and Literacy in the Early Years, London, Sage Publications Ltd. Wilson, A. (2005), Language Knowledge for primary Teachers: 3rd ed, London, David Fulton Publishers Ltd. The National Curriculum, Available from www.naction.org.uk, [Accessed on 1 March 2006] The Standards Site, Available from www.stadards.dfes.gov.uk/primary/publications/literacy/818497/pns_SpeakListen06240hbk.pdf, [Accessed on 3 March 2006] ?? ?? ?? ?? 1 ...read more.

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