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Do These Sources And The Site At Quarry Bank Mill, Fully Explain What Working Conditions Were Like For Children In Textile Mills In The Late Eighteen And Early Nineteenth Centuries?

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Aime´┐Ż Hoole 10a Do These Sources And The Site At Quarry Bank Mill, Fully Explain What Working Conditions Were Like For Children In Textile Mills In The Late Eighteen And Early Nineteenth Centuries? In this essay I am going to write about and explain what working conditions were like for children working in textile mills in the late 18 and early 19 centuries. I will examine and discuss the working conditions at Quarry Bank Mill and compare them with the other sources. The sources are paragraphs containing information about other different mills around England. I will write about the context of the sources, are they primary or secondary, are the sources reliable or biased, do the sources give evidence etc. Source A is a paragraph of an eyewitness account of a visit to Quarry Bank Mill which was taken from the book "The Conditions of the Working Class in England" written by Frederick Engel in 1845 who was a campaigner for the rights of factory work, who visited the mill. In side the mill Engel describes the condition as lofty airy rooms with fine machinery and healthy looking workers. He describes the workers condition as being comfortable and that they were well paid, this evidence is less reliable because there is not enough information to show what working conditions were like for children. This shows that Greg was good to his workers. Frederick Engel thought that he would see misery and starvation and that the workers hate the manufacturers, but he dose not see that here in the present of Mr Greg. The workers were limited to read newspapers or else they were sacked, this gives evidence that Greg is very domineering, dictated to what they could or could not do and is very much in control. Source A doesn't say that Engel did actually visited Quarry Bank Mill in person but there is no real evidence to say that that he did visit the mill so this make the information less reliable. ...read more.


We don't know who printed it or which factory it's supposed to be. It dose not look like Quarry Bank Mill. The picture is not useful as evidence of what conditions were like or child labour. In the picture is a big room full of cotton machines with 2 people working them and 1 person underneath the machines sweeping up on his hand and knees. But the 3 people in the picture don't look like children, so I think the children might be under the machines sweeping up also. The only thing that is useful about the conditions for the workers is that in the picture you can see that the windows are shut so the dust and the loose cotton in the air are breathed in which can cause lung problems, also the cotton is highly flammable, so one tiny spark from one of the working machines could start a fire. I think this picture was made for a newspaper, so I think the audience would be anyone who buys the paper. This picture is primary, it was printed at the time this is helpful information. The working conditions at Quarry Bank Mill were much better than those in urban mills. But there were some terrible conditions working in the mill. The machines were all packed tightly into the factory and there were no safety guards so it was very easy to get caught up in the machines, so there would have been many accidents and even deaths, however in source B from Quarry Bank Mill it shows that there were very rarely any deaths from people getting caught in the machines, although not all cases may have been recorded from the mill to avoid a bad, dangerous reputation. In the factory it would have been very loud because of all the machines, so the workers put cotton in their ears to prevent damage to their ears. ...read more.


Working in the there were no punishment only encouragement and kindness. So workers worked better lived better and got better treatment. In conclusion the conditions at Quarry Bank Mill appear to be better than in urban mills. I think Greg was a good employer than other mill other mill owners, he treated his workers with respect, he built them there own church, he built them nice houses, the wages were good and punishments weren't severe. He was also good to his apprentices children, he was educating them and giving them a chance of a good future, and was sending them to church which wasn't necessary but he wanted them to go anyway. He employed a doctor which wasn't requirement, so he wanted to keep his apprentices in good health. He also did not enforce physical punishments, and there were hardly any deaths. He provided them with cheap rent for good quality housing. But it was sometimes too good in the way it worked compared to other mills, there didn't seem to be many faults where as if you compare it to Cromford which had no paternalism, and corporal punishments, so therefore I think that Quarry Bank Mill was used as a 'typical example' of a mill as it showed the industry in a good light. Looking from the sources most of them are reliable and useful and looking from the sources it still gives you an idea that the conditions at Quarry Bank Mill are better then other mills. But I don't think that you can use this information and go far with it to really show what children working conditions were really like at Quarry Bank Mill because source C is just an extract and wasn't written at the time children were treated badly in mills, source E is just a picture which we hardly know anything about, source D is Greg's side of a punishment account and A and B are taken from books. But basically all of the sources evidence is not complete enough to say what working conditions were really like for children in mills. ...read more.

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