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Explain the differing reactions of British people to the policy of evacuating children during the Second World War.

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Introduction

Explain the differing reactions of British people to the policy of evacuating children during the Second World War. It is widely believed that the evacuation process of the Second World War was not only successful, but for those involved the time was thoroughly enjoyed. This in fact was not always the case. The reactions of children, parents and families receiving children varied extremely. In this essay I will try to show how different people reacted and why. Any school children evacuating the cities left with their schools. For many of the children this would be the first time they had left their local community, and for many the countryside seemed like an "Alien" place. ...read more.

Middle

Most children had been accustomed to sharing a bed with five or six people and some even using the floor as a regular place to sleep. The change to the much higher quality of living frightened lots of children as one account shows " Everything was so clean. We were given face flannels and toothbrushes. We'd never brushed our teeth until then. I didn't like it. It was scaring." Some of the children's general verminous state was astounding, and often resulted in whole schools being fumigated because of the head lice, scabies, impetigo and septic sores that many of them carried. This was a problem for people receiving children as the sheer lack of knowledge in areas such as personal hygiene and table manners, and resulted in children even considering it perfectly acceptable thing to excrete on the carpet. ...read more.

Conclusion

The relationship between the receiving families and the evacuees was not always good. This simply was of the divide in class. The evacuation process itself was breaking through lifelong barriers. These were not only regional barriers but also social ones, as very rarely before evacuation had social classes mixed at all. This didn't always affect a bond appearing in the cross-social relationship. In fact quite a few children enjoyed their stay so much that they kept in touch years afterwards and some even "Considered them family." This leads me to conclude that many people had different reactions and experiences of the evacuation. These were mainly affected by who the person was and their previous social upbringing and back ground. ...read more.

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