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Explain the Differing Reactions Of People In Britain To The Policy Of Evacuating Children During the Second World War.

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Introduction

Explain the Differing Reactions Of People In Britain To The Policy Of Evacuating Children During the Second World War. In this essay I am going to display the reactions that people in Britain had too the evacuation of Children at the start of the Second World War and the duration of the war. The reactions of people were in fact differing and some contrasted each other. With the children now deprived of the major cities they lived in yet safe in the security the countryside offered. Many people living in Britain had a firm opinion of what they thought of the whole procedure. Some agreed with the procedure, whilst others disagreed to which I will explain. Some where even forced to like the idea even though they were strongly against it. Either way everybody had an opinion whether it was good or bad. ...read more.

Middle

The issued stress would be reduced as the children would after all be in a safer place out of danger. The Civil Defence Forces would then be able to concentrate on other important aspects dominating the war. Others that had an important yet firm view were the hosts in the countryside. It can be said that not all the hosts were happy with the arrival of the children, however the majority of the hosts were more in shock then un-satisfaction. They were known to be disgusted with the state of which the children from the cities were in. They simply could not believe how deprived and bad mannered they were. The children would urinate against the walls, as this was the way of which they had been brought up. The hosts had explained the new living conditions to them yet the children chose to disobey them. ...read more.

Conclusion

Its not a sight a child should ever have to view. When the children arrived at the countryside, greeted by the host families and taken to their new home they were surprised too see how clean their new lifestyle was to be. Some children explained that they were given toothbrushes yet had never brushed their teeth before. So the children, although they may have been scared at first they were kept safe and out of danger. This new comfortable living they had adjusted too helped them to forget about their troubles. And finally I shall explain the reaction of the children's parents. The mothers although uneasy of having to sacrifice her child or children, felt comfortable knowing that their children were safe, healthy and well. They felt that by doing this they were giving a contribution to the war. This contribution proved sufficient satisfaction for them too hand over their child. Word count so far: 733 Robert Anderson 11R ...read more.

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