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Explain the value of the cognitive perspective in supporting individuals

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Introduction

P5- Explain the value of the cognitive perspective in supporting individuals Task 1 Cognitive/information processing perspective: The cognitive/information processing perspective Piaget: Jean Piaget (1896-1980) was a psychologist that looked at the minds of children and how they develop. His findings came to the conclusion that most children have the same minds about the world and the discoveries growing up entails. Piaget also discovered that children will make the same sort of mistakes in life but learn and come to the correct conclusion at the end. Unlike many psychologists Piaget believed that the environment in which a child is brought up in does not predicate a child's future. It purely lets the child to understand there environment but does not shape them as a person. This is called an active process. According to Bee, H. & Boyd, D. ...read more.

Middle

According to Bee, H. & Boyd, D. (2004) The Developing Child. London: Pearson Education, Inc Piaget's stages of development: Stage Age Key features Stage 1: Sensory-motor 0-2 years The world is experienced through motor activity and the senses Stage 2: Pre-operational 2-7 years Language develops along with memory. The child is egocentric and unable to conserve Stage 3: Concrete operational 7-11 years The child can now understand conservation but cannot yet solve problems mentally Stage 4: Formal operational 11 + years The child can now use abstract thoughts and represent problems mentally Table found from: (Stretch, B. & Whitehouse, M. (eds.) (2010) Health and Social Care BTEC National Level 3 Book 1. England: Pearson Education Ltd.) Kelly: George Kelly (1905-1966) ...read more.

Conclusion

'Kelly believed that we do not have to be constrained by our past history but can seek out new, alternative, more positive meanings.' George Kelly believed that people believe who they are by how other people portray us. We do not have a positive meaning of which we are only what other people mention about us. For example, if someone says that not smoking or drinking while at parties isn't the 'normal' or 'cool' then people's behaviour changes to fit in. 'We build up a continuous and changing picture of ourselves out of our interaction with others.' Information found from: * (Stretch, B. & Whitehouse, M. (eds.) (2010) Health and Social Care BTEC National Level 3 Book 1. England: Pearson Education Ltd.) * (Gross, R. (1999) Psychology, The science of mind and behaviour. Bath: Hodder & Stoughton. p.523). ...read more.

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