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Eye Witness Testimony. research into this area has found that eyewitness testimony can be affected by many psychological factors

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Introduction

Eyewitness testimony: Eyewitness testimony is an important area of research in cognitive psychology and human memory. It refers to an account given by people of an event they have witnessed. For example they may be required to give a description at a trail of a robbery or a road accident someone has seen. Jurys tend to pay close attention to eyewitness testimony and generally find it a reliable source of information. However, research into this area has found that eyewitness testimony can be affected by many psychological factors: - Age of witness: Age of witness can be one of many factors on eyewitness testimony. ...read more.

Middle

Loftus Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate how information supplied after an event, influences a witness's memory for that event. The study actually consists of two laboratory experiments. They are both examples of an independent measures design. The independent variable in both of the experiments is the verb used. The dependent variable in the first experiment is the participant's speed estimate and the dependent variable in the second experiment is whether the participant believed they saw glass. ...read more.

Conclusion

Second Experiment Procedure: The second experiment was to provide additional insights into the origin of the different speed estimates. In particular they wanted to find out if the participants memories really had been distorted by the verbal label. A similar procedure was used whereby 150 student participants viewed a short (one minute) film which contained a 4 second scene of a multiple car accident, and were then questioned about it. Findings: They found that the more they get told about the accident the more they believe that what they are told is true, and therefore believe they've seen it. - Malene Leivestad ...read more.

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