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I will be looking at the three different types of play that can promote learning for the chosen age range. The following are descriptions of these three types of play:

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Introduction The age range I will be looking at is four years to five years eleven months old, therefore in the reception class following the Foundation Stage curriculum. The National Curriculum for Physical Education (DFE, 1995a) for all year groups in Key Stages 1 and 2 became a legal requirement on 1 August 1995, by means of an Order made by the Secretaries of State for Education and for Wales. As the reception class does not follow the National curriculum yet they do not come under this, although many schools do include this class in physical education lessons. I will be looking at the three different types of play that can promote learning for the chosen age range. The following are descriptions of these three types of play: 1. Creative play- creative is where children explore and discover things around them in an inventive way. It has a lot to do with the children's senses, what they hear, see, smell, taste, and touch and also to do with different materials. If children are provided with opportunities, experiences and activities. The children could also develop skills such as: * Physical- fines and grosses motor skills * Social- working in pairs or groups will make the children feel more confident and will and will heighten their self-esteem. * Emotional- drawing/painting feelings (happy and sad colours). The children will feel proud of their work. * Intellectual- knowledge of subject and materials used In this area of play I believe it should be stressed that children should be praised as they have put a lot of work into something even if it is totally non-recognisable as anything, considering some of the most famous artists drew/painted in abstract and their work is widely appreciated. At this age creative activities will be greatly influenced by key stage one requirements. They will have creativity incorporated into the learning of other topics. ...read more.


These skills will be helpful in later life for the children to make healthy relationships. 3. One play opportunity for physical play is swimming some schools have pools on the property and use them for regular lessons, however for schools that do not have this facility can organise to go on weekly trips to the local pool or just as a one off. Swimming is a great way of exercising as well as good physical fun. Swimming uses all of the muscles in the body and can be developed and refined. Swimming can link with all of the ten areas of co-ordination. It is suitable for all ages particularly because there can be different classes for different abilities and there is always room to progress. Children with any sort of impairment can also join in as there should be helpers available and equipment that would aid them getting in and out of the pool. Swimming would improve physical skills in children by working all of the muscles at the same time and progressing at this. It will strengthen muscle including the heart; maintaining and developing bone density. It allows the children to exercise their whole bodies inside and out! There is also opportunity for fine motor development in the form of bricks and bands, which are thrown to the bottom of the pool at different depths, which the children have to collect. It is important to encourage children but not pressure hem as it may have adverse affects later in life. The role of the adult in all of the play opportunities is to supervise the children; it is also to provide any materials or equipment that will be needed. The adult will have to think about health and safety for the activity to make sure that no harm comes to the children. The adult will be there to explain what to do initially and be there to answer any questions the children may have. ...read more.


It would benefit best during the morning as the children have a lot of energy and this would help them to concentrate in the afternoon better. Also they could have more and different equipment to use. * Learning about and having more experiences about religions, races and beliefs. Trips could be organised to go to a place of praying for certain religions e.g. visiting a mosque. They could also learn about different ways people are blessed under the eyes of God e.g. baptising, christening. They could learn about this by the teacher obtaining a videotape of a ceremony like this. Play opportunities are important in the early years because it enables development in five areas, creative, physical, imaginative, manipulative and social. Tassoni and Beith (2002 p52) 'A children need to play: * To develop an enquiring mind and through experiment and discovery develop early concepts. * To allow children to develop their physical awareness and gross motor skill. * To create an understanding attitude towards the natural world. * To form a sound foundation on which to build all future knowledge and develop early reading and mathematical concepts. * To enable children to acquire manipulative skills, spatial awareness and understanding of the properties/characteristics of materials. * To gain aesthetic awareness, tackle experiences, pleasure of colour and personal satisfaction in creation. * To encourage children to express themselves, socialise and cope with their emotions through role-play and the beginning of drama. The social part of play is especially important as children learn from others and they learn to interact appropriately with both adults and children. It helps children to cooperate in-group situations. Most importantly a positive early years play experience affects how children will feel act in the school later on in life. It can be the decider on whether they appreciate school and have an enjoyment in being there or whether they are rebellious and badly behaved. It could be said that 'first impressions count' and as children spend the first part of their school life in the foundation stage class this is how it could be seen. ...read more.

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