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Psychological explanations and theories of stress

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Introduction

Lesson 8 STRESS - MORE STRESS - SNAP Introduction So far we have talked about psychology as being a topic worth studying because it looks into human behaviour and why it presents itself in the way that it does. I have explained that all that we will discuss throughout this course will in some way relate to you, your family or those that you know or will come across in your lifetime. But the examples I have used so far may or may not have related to you depending on your upbringing or personal circumstances. But our studies now bring us to the point where we need to don the psychologist's hat and analyse a specific bit of human behaviour so that we can see how psychologists approach their research and come up with the conclusions that they do. Therefore I want us to investigate the issue of 'stress'. As a topic, this will not be a difficult one to demonstrate to you with regard to linking it with human, and more importantly, your behaviour. All I have to tell you to do is recall the lead up to and the day of your GCSE exams. Most, if not all will have experienced stress, and some may have even made themselves ill because of it, but definitely you will have witnessed a lot of stress going on around you in the exam hall. ...read more.

Middle

the dentist;, whereas the psychological issues vary greatly but usually exist, though seem less easy to state in words. Fear is usually the key and could be as simple as fear of never being loved for your true self, or as anxiety causing as the fear of having a panic attack with no one around to help you. So why do we get stressed? We get stressed because we believe that there is a need to respond to a situation that is confronting us, though the situation, as we perceive it is one that we are not sufficiently capable of dealing with effectively. If I were to ask you to sit down now and write me out the alphabet in no more than one minute I imagine that no one would have a problem with this, and there would be no level of stress involved. You are being challenged but you perceive instantly that the challenge is easily met so do not generate any levels of anxiety about accomplishing the task. But if I were to ask you to sit an exam based on anything that we have covered in the first six weeks of the course, and that to fail the exam would mean that you could no longer continue on the course, there would probably be a few, if not all, that would grow slightly anxious about whether they had learnt sufficient detail from the notes and lessons that we have covered so far. ...read more.

Conclusion

Answers on a postcard to 'Insomniacs Puzzle Hour', ECC, Plymouth!! Is stress controllable? To a point the answer is 'yes', though I have to say immediately that this is not strictly true. Yes, in as much as we can learn to deal with life and the issues it presents to us in a more realistic and logical way, therefore removing some of the avoidable stressful issues that we set up for ourselves. But we also have to say that stress, as a life preserver, should not be eliminated, as our body needs to protectively react to the unexpected issues that confront us throughout our lives. Without stress reactions we would not avoid vehicles careering out of control on the pavement where we are walking; to be able to dodge flying objects that fall from trees or are missiled at us by some spiteful individual; or be able to respond alertly when some teacher suddenly spitefully wakes you up in their lesson to answer the impossible question that they harass you with as a form of embarrassing punishment! (No falling asleep in my lessons!!) Understanding stress It is hoped that by understanding the processes involved in stress reaction that the individual will be able to better prepare them self for the unavoidable and also discipline themselves sufficiently so that they can reduce the sometimes harmful effects that long term stress can cause. Christopher Porter - Friday, 26th October 2001 2 ...read more.

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Discipline is probably not the answer to learning how to deal with stress or learning how to reduce it. Being aware, being reflective and understanding how much stress one can cope with before it has a really negative effect on health, is probably a better conclusion.

Marked by teacher Linda Penn 01/05/2013

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