• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Source B suggests that factory owners operated bad working conditions for their employees. From your study of Quarry Bank Mill and the Gregs explain whether you agree with this interpretation. Refer to sources A-D carefully in your answer.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Question 3 - Study Sources A, B, C and D Source B suggests that factory owners operated bad working conditions for their employees. From your study of Quarry Bank Mill and the Gregs explain whether you agree with this interpretation. Refer to sources A-D carefully in your answer. Source B, written by Pauline Greg, has been taken from the book 'A Social and Economic History of Britain.' Source B has been taken from the seventh edition, which shows it, has been updated. After World War II more people were interested in the middle class people because the class system changed. People who were of lower class were not as discriminated as much as before. Source B is a generalisation of the factory conditions, therefore it may not be an accurate piece of evidence regarding the conditions at Quarry Bank Mill. Historians may have a new approach to the way in which they viewed sources because of the time they were living in. There may have been a tendency for historians to be shocked about the way in which people were treated at the mills because of the time period. The conditions the workers may have experienced may have been seen as suitable for the factory owners, however for Pauline Greg she may have been astonished by the appalling conditions. ...read more.

Middle

This Factory Act was affective because inspectors were appointed to check on what was happening at the factories. Source A includes accurate information for example about the amount of hours children worked. For example it says how children worked 'twelve hours from six in the morning to seven at night; a hour at noon for dinner.' Another source agrees with the amount of hours that the children had to work. Source 39 mentions how the children worked 'twelve hours from six in the morning till seven at night. ' Both sources show the same information to helps to prove that both sources could be more reliable. However Pauline Greg mentions how the children worked in shifts of twelve, fifteen or more hours. ' Pauline Greg does not know exactly how many hours the children had to work and has made a very general comment in her findings. Source A is an extract from an interview between the superintendents who looked after Greg's apprentices and Samuel Greg was present at the interview. The interview describes how the conditions in the factories were not as terrible as Pauline Greg portrays them to be. Although when visiting Quarry Bank Mill I was told how Samuel Greg always wanted his mill to have a good reputation. ...read more.

Conclusion

She has given a very broad generalisation of the conditions in the factories. Sources C and D are about the young girl called Esther Price who was punished for leaving the apprentice house. Both sources relate to Esther Price however they are a little contradictory. I think I accept source C more than source D. I feel this way because of the way in which Esther Price has been conveyed. When Robert Hyde was writing this extract, he had no reason to portray the factories has having bad working conditions for the apprentices. However, source D written by John Doherty, is written for a purpose. Doherty was a campaigner trying to reduce the children's hours of employment in cotton mills. Therefore he may have exaggerated the severity of the conditions in the mills in order to serve his purpose. For example in comparison to source C, Esther Price was kept in a 'spare room' but in source D Doherty has written how she was kept in a 'dungeon' as a punishment. A 'dungeon' sounds far more severe and worse than a 'space room.' Pauline Gregg wrote how intense the punishment, which the children received was. Pauline Greg writes how one boy was 'hung by his wrists over moving machinery, so that he was compelled to hold his legs up to avoid mutilation.' So??? Rubarani Balasothy 11A ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Developmental Psychology section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Developmental Psychology essays

  1. "Working conditions were terrible in 19th century Britain." Does the evidence support this view?

    Hansard took part in a Parliamentary Debate in 1879. "In 1838, being desirous to see the condition of the children--for I knew that they were employed at very early ages in the worsted business....I asked for a collection of cripples and deformities. In a short time more than 80 were gathered in a large courtyard."

  2. Do these sources, and the site at Quarry Bank Mill, fully explain what working ...

    Fines were generally small, for small wrong-doings. They were either deducted from a workers salary or paid for by overtime. The most common fining offence was for being late to work; this was common because workers had no way of telling the time accurately. At Quarry Bank, fining was used, and workers were deducted 2 shillings for

  1. To what extent does the evidence of Sources B and C support the evidence ...

    However, in a number of ways, Source B disagrees with the other sources. For example, although source C says that the apprentices only worked twelve hours a day source B says that they were forced to work overtime, and although source D suggests that the apprentices did receive schooling, Source

  2. "Evacuation was a great success" Do you agree with this interpretation? Explain your answer ...

    This backs up my own knowledge about lack of organisation the Government put into evacuation despite having realised many years ago that in the event of another war evacuation was likely. It is a well used phrase "but when I looked at their faces my heart melted and I couldn't

  1. Using studies from the list below, answer the questions which follow: Rosenhan (sane in ...

    Hans told his father of a dream/fantasy which his father summarised as follows: 'In the night there was a big giraffe in the room and a crumpled one: and the big one called out because I took the crumpled one away from it.

  2. Do These Sources And The Site At Quarry Bank Mill Fully Explain What Working ...

    London and Styal are a great distance away from each other, which leaves us curious as to whether the couple may have been bribed all the way there. If this is true then the couple may have been worried about what would happen on the way back if they made any criticisms about the Mill.

  1. Do These Sources And The Site At Quarry Bank Mill, Fully Explain What Working ...

    This evidence is less consistent because they are not telling the whole truth about the conditions. I don't think the Government Official went to Quarry Bank Mill himself for the interview because the interview took place in London and the mill is in Cheshire this gives evident to say that

  2. Why do sources A to E differ in their attitudes to the evacuation of ...

    cities with German planes flying over, to the safety of the bright countryside. Below the picture is a section of text, which basically outlines how the foster parents in Scotland have done a great job, but more volunteers are needed.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work