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The aim of this practical was to attempt to replicate Harrison and Saeed,s (1977) analysis of lonely hearts advertisements using a quantitative technique, to test the hypothesis that when personal advertisement are placed

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Introduction

Socialisation Race and Gender. Project: Mate Selection. By: Delroy Flemmings. Year 1 Abstract. The aim of this practical was to attempt to replicate Harrison and Saeed,s (1977) analysis of lonely hearts advertisements using a quantitative technique, to test the hypothesis that when personal advertisement are placed in various publications, from the local newspaper to national tabloids, that general level of social desirability offered matched the level of social level of desirability sought, and individuals seeking attractiveness in a partner were more likely to offer physical attractiveness of their own. 80 heterosexual romantic advertisement (40 of each sex) placed in the personal column, from one of the local newspaper were randomly collected and analysed. Each were put into identical categories as in Harrison and Saeed (1977) study. The results were generally supportive of that men were more likely than women to offer financial resources and honesty/sincerity, and to seek attractiveness, appealing body shape. In selecting a potential mate, women were more likely than men to offer an appealing body shape and to seek financial resources, qualities likely to lead to resource acquisition, and honesty/sincerity in potential mates. Women were also more likely than men to seek male friendship and/or companionship and to offer greater involvement only after the establishment of such friendship, whereas men more frequently than women made explicit requests for a sexual relationship. Introduction. According to Darwinian theory, where one sex competes for mates, mate selection is expected to occur among the other sex. Trivers (1985). Among mammals, females who invest more time and energy in offspring tend to demonstrate more selectivity in their choice of mating partners. They prefer males who are ready and able to expend effort in helping to raise offspring. Consequently, they select mates that possess valuable resources that could be transformed into reproductive advantage through the increased number of surviving offspring (Daly and Wilson 1983). It is expected that these preferences also work among humans (Symons1979; Buss 1987). ...read more.

Middle

The racial/ethnic categories were white, caribbean,oriental, dark complexion, mauritian, and no mention. The religious categories no mention were made. The marital status were divorce, single, and no mention. Advertiser's age was coded in one of the following categories: under 20, 20-29, 30-39, 40-49, 50-59, 60 and over. if no specific age was mention, age was coded as absent. Interest in Marriage. Specific reference to marriage was coded as Sought or Offered. Interest in Permanent Relationship. Specific reference to a relationship other than marriage was coded as Sought or Offered. example include long-term relationship, lasting relationship. Request for Photograph. Specific request by writer for respondent to send a photograph was not mention. RESULTS Of the 80 coded advertisements, 50% (n = 40) were placed by males, with 50% (n = 40) placed by females. The male age group range from between 30-45 years, compared to the females, which was more varied with respect to age (20-"late fifties"). Attractiveness There was significant differences on all variables measured in the response section. Approximately more than 20% women, 15% men sought attractiveness, where as 45% women, and 17.5% of men were offering. Physical Women 27.5% were more likely than men 22.5% to seeking physical attractiveness, compared to 75% men, and 62.5% women who were more likely to offer these characteristics. Demographic Although there was a very high percentage of 62.5% of the men and 67.5% of the women who desired difference variable within the demographic scale, it must be taken into consideration that the age variable was not isolated, it was part of the demographic variable which consisted of Racial/ethnic, Religion, Martial status. Therefore, no inference can be made, about differences between both male or female preferences. (Kenrick & Keefe 1992: Wiederman 1993; Waynforth & Dunbar 1995). suggest that as women age,female advertisers prefer mates with a relatively similar age difference. This result seems to correspond to the other studies on this topic, which claimed a relatively stable preference about their mates' age across life span. ...read more.

Conclusion

Gender stereotypes: Traditions and alternatives, Brooks/Cole Publishing Co. 15. Curry, T., & Hock, R. (1981). Sex differences in sex role ideas in early adolescence. adolescence, 16, p779-789. 16. Deaux, K., & Hanna, R. (1984). Courtship in the personal column: The influence of gender and sexual orientation. Sex Roles, 11, 363-375. 17. Basow, S. (1986). Gender stereotypes: Traditions and alternatives, Brooks/Cole Publishing Co. 18. Harrison, A., & Saeed, L. (1977). Let us make a deal: An analysis of revelations and stipulations in lonely-hearts advertisements. Journal of personality and social psychology, 35, p257-264. 19. Farrell, W. (1986). Why men are the way, they are. New York: berkley Books. 20. Basow, S. (1986). Gender stereotypes: Traditions and alternatives, Brooks/Cole Publishing Co. 21. Davis, S. (1990). Men as Success Objects and Women as Sex Objects: A Study of Personal Advertisements. p43-44. Plenum Publishing Corp. 22. Davis, K. E. & Latty-Mann, H. (1987). `Love Styles and Relationship Quality: A Contribution to Validation', Journal of Social and Personal Relationships 4: p 409-29. 23. Chappell, K. D. & Davis, K. E. (1993). `Working Models of Attachment and partner choice; Effects of Partner and Attachment Style'. 24. Latty-Mann, H. & Davis, K. E. (1990). Attachment Theory and Partner Choice: Preference and Actuality; Journal of Social and Personal Relationships Vol 13: p8 25. Murray, J. P. Rubinstein, E. A. & Comstock, G. A. (1972). Television and social behaviour, Vol2: Television and social learning- Washington; US Government Printing Agency.- Cited in - Manstead, A. S. R.& McCulloch, C. (1981). Sex-Role stereotyping in British television advertisements British Journal of Social Psychology 20 p171. 26. Harrison, A., & Saeed, L. (1977). Let's make a deal: An analysis of revelations and stipulations in lonely-hearts advertisements. Journal of personality and social psychology, 35, p257-264 27. Buss, D. M. (1989) Sex differences in human mate preferences: evolutionary hypotheses tested in 37 cultures. Behaviour. Brain Sci. 25, 1-15. 28. Buss, D. M. (1994). The evolution of desire. New York: Basic books. 29. Buss, D. M. & Barnes, M. (1986). ...read more.

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