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The World of the forms is a myth made up by Plato. Discuss.

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Introduction

"The World of the forms is a myth made up by Plato" The world of the forms was a theory created by the philosopher Plato. The theory suggests that the world we live in is a world of appearances but the real world is a world of ideas that he calls Forms. By Forms Plato meant the idea of what a thing is. Plato uses the example of cat as in helps to describe how there are many different types of cats but they all match to some degree the idea of what a cat is. ...read more.

Middle

These include the concepts of justice beauty, love etc. Thus supporting the view that the world of the forms is not a myth. However, those who think that Plato's world of the forms is a myth would argue that, various cultures have different understandings and traditions i.e. Justice in Saudi Arabia is very different to ours with things like cutting off peoples hands for stealing. On the other hand according to Crito, recollection is different in some cultures that are close to the forms. ...read more.

Conclusion

What is the origin of the Form of man? How many is that? Aristotle was saying that a copy of a form could turn out to be an infinite series that never stopped, this would makes the Theory of Forms meaningless as a way of explaining the ultimate origin of concepts such as the Good, truth and justice. On both sides there appears to be some sort of persuasive argument however, I do feel that Plato's world of the forms does seem to be just a theory as it does not cover all situations ( i.e. different cultures). ?? ?? ?? ?? George Lucas ?????????help?????????? ...read more.

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