AS and A Level: Christianity

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  1. Examine the role of 10th and 9th century prophecy according to the prophets you have studied

    They are also called to be the spokespersons of Yhwh as they gave oracles (messages) that are believed to come from God. Another role of prophets as we see with Samuel is as a seer. They have a close relationship with God and therefore can see things that ordinary people can't. They are said to be foretellers and forthtellers. Prophets like Samuel uses the natural world to interpret the will of God; also they used scared dice called Umin and Thummim. We see this when Saul comes looking for the donkeys. Also not only are they seer they are a paid professionals, 'I happen to have a quarter of a silver shekel'.

    • Length: 756 words
  2. Overview of the Major Biblical Prophets

    Lamentations--a lamentation of Jeremiah expressing his profoundly deep sorrow concerning the destruction of Jerusalem and Judah. Ezekiel--a prophet during the exile. Daniel--a prophet of Enormous integrity and administrative ability who lived in Babylon during the exile. ISAIAH Isaiah's name means "God is Salvation". The book of Isaiah involves the ministry of one of God's great prophets who lived in the latter half of the eight century before Christ. He prophesied for a period lasting forty to sixty years during the reign of four rulers of the southern kingdom of Judah, Uzziah, Jotham, Ahaz and Hezekiah.

    • Length: 1003 words
  3. The Celtic Saints are of no lasting significance in the history of Christianity. Discuss how far this is true.

    The impact that Patrick had on Christianity in Ireland and throughout the rest of the Christian world is quite substantial, even if some of the reasons he is remembered, such as the miracle of driving all the snakes out of Ireland are debated upon scholars. Patrick is the most famous of the Celtic saints and the best remembered, however the others did leave their marks on the church as well. Saint David, Patron saint of Wales is also regarded a Celtic saint and is again a well-known figure head in the church.

    • Length: 685 words
  4. God Hates Divorce. God in His infinite wisdom and knowledge gives us the person that will be best suitable for us.

    This shows us how important is this command and why God hates divorce so much. The failure to keep the first command affected the whole human race for generation after generations, the failure to keep this second command will also affect the human race generation after generations and even it will cause the mankind to stop be in existence. This is another reason why God hates divorce so much. When men get divorced they forget their first love. Marriage is a love relationship. When man is angry he cannot make a right decision. An angry head cannot evaluate the relationship that was made by a loving heart.

    • Length: 953 words
  5. Explain the reasons for the spread of Christianity in the first three centuries.

    In the Old Testament Palestine is recorded as the corridor between the two continents of Africa and Asia. Later, the Romans extended their Empire by joining their northern and southern provinces by taking Palestine. It was in this small yet central location that the event of Pentecost took place. We are told in Acts 3:41 that there were about three thousand converts on the day of Pentecost. Filled with new-found faith and the Holy Spirit these believers proceeded to convert people in areas surrounding Palestine.

    • Length: 1230 words
  6. Parables. Give an account of the content and teaching of the Good Samaritan and the Pharisee and The Tax Collector.

    It was uncommon for anyone to travel this road by themselves, and it can therefore be said that any trouble experienced by the traveller was a consequence of his own actions - he had no one to blame but himself. Perhaps, therefore (as Barclay claims) the first lesson in this parable is that we must help even those who have brought trouble upon themselves. Now that the geography has been discussed, what can we learn from the actions of those in the parable?

    • Length: 2464 words
  7. Examine why the writers of the synoptic gospels edited the material they used.

    Another important event that occurred in Jesus' life was the Bar Mitzvah- the coming of age. This is where Jesus goes to the temple at the age of twelve. "They found him in the temple sitting with the Jewish teachers, listening to them, and asking questions. All who heard him were amazed at his intelligent answers..." (Luke 2:46-47). Luke was acknowledged as doctor, and it was occasionally proposed the author of Luke has particular interest in the diagnosis of illness. Luke tends to be more sympathetic than Mark to the work of doctors. It becomes noticeable in the story of how Jesus cured women with an incurable disease.

    • Length: 1070 words
  8. The Worldview of Catholicism reflects upon the core beliefs of Christianity through various beliefs

    Jesus is proven to be the second person of the trinity; God the son who took upon himself a complete human nature. "The Word became flesh and made his dwelling amongst us" (John 1:14). The fact that he was once among us and endured the same human limitations (slept, ate, felt emotions) helped Christians to appreciate the pain and suffering that he endured for the sake of an eternal life for us. His divinity shows us the close, unique relationship that exists between himself and God, expressed through the quote, "if you know me, you will know my Father also" (John 16:6-7).

    • Length: 714 words
  9. The Kingdom of God was the centre of Gods teachings Discuss.

    From the very beginning and throughout his ministry, Jesus preached about the kingdom of God that it was now present. This was the "realised eschatology" which was promoted by C.H. Dodd. The kingdom of God has been rapidly advancing from the time of John the Baptist. Jesus was describing the exponential growth of the Kingdom of God. He referred to kingdom of God has a seed being planted and growing into a fully grown crop ready for harvest (Mark 4:26-29).

    • Length: 876 words
  10. Outline and examine Jesus attitudes concerning wealth and the poor. To what extent do these teachings depart from Judaism?

    What Caird suggests is that from the tale the rich man at the end begs Abraham for Lazarus to go tell his brothers to not do what he has done, but Caird says that this is because he has failed at his opportunities, so he does not want the same to happen to the rest of his family. Another attitude of Jesus is that wealth is not a bad thing, but it should always be used in the right way though.

    • Length: 1504 words
  11. Outline and Examine Jesus attitudes towards outcasts in Lukes Gospel.To what extent do these attitudes fit in with Judaism?

    The most noticeable example out of these parables is in The Calling of Levi (5: 27-32), in which a Tax collector called Levi, who at the time was considered an outcast because the population regarded Tax collectors as evil, was asked by Jesus to "follow him", before Levi held a banquet for Jesus. Now, it was Pharisee's and Scribes who questioned what Jesus was doing, which is when we discover one of Jesus' attitudes; it isn't the good people that need his help, but actually the outcasts that need his help, as he firstly says "It is not the healthy

    • Length: 2534 words
  12. Outline the arguments for the dependency of morality and religion

    Kant said there must be "a holy author of the world who makes possible the highest good'. In a sense, God allows us to reach our most perfect sense, at the point at which we die and enter the afterlife. If it is this holy author that allows one to be moral, and this holy author is God, there is a clear dependency on religion for morality. People are often held to a higher standard than that which a large proportion of humanity can claim to have themselves, and this is because this higher standard is what we consider to be moral, and this comes from God.

    • Length: 1327 words
  13. Explain how God is shown in the Bible as a Creator

    For example, God did not create all life, but neither did we, so we should still treat it as someone else's property. The very first account of Creation is told in Genesis 1:1-3. In this 7-Day story, God creates all of the heavens and the earth, the land and the seas, the fish and the birds and man and woman. Everything is good in this world, it is all intentionally created and Adam and Eve live peacefully in the Garden, in dominance of the Animals and the land, with but one limitation, which is not to eat the Fruit of the Tree of Knowledge of Good and Evil.

    • Length: 1003 words
  14. Explain the role of God as a judge(25 marks)

    This serves the purpose of giving us an incentive to follow God- a loving direction in which he leads. Biblically, the idea of God as a judge is supported by Jesus' sermons "Do not judge lest ye be judged" "My father in heaven will be the judge". However this causes the question of whether an omnibenevolent being can engage in judgement. From one angle it seems unlikely how if judgement is forbidden for us how it could be contextually good for God. However, form the Xian viewpoint God has the right to judge everything to his perfect standard and as he creates the laws for us to follow judging in no way lessens his perfect love.

    • Length: 515 words
  15. Discuss and assess the view that according to the author of Lukes gospel it was Jesus conflict with the religious rather than political authorities which led to his crucifixion

    They had limited powers and intervened mainly in religious issues. The Political authorities were the Romans who ruled over Israel at that time. The ultimate leader of the Roman Empire was Caesar who had many powerful people that worked under him ruling provinces such as Herod and Pilate. The Romans had the ultimate power to put someone to death. The government practiced one of the first 'one country, two systems' policy, everyone had religious and political freedom yet the Romans maintained strict control.

    • Length: 1664 words
  16. The Gospel was written to prove to non-believers that Jesus Christ is the Son of God Examine this claim regarding the purpose of Lukes Gospel.

    Jesus and his family had gone to the Temple in Jerusalem for Passover when Jesus was 12. On the way back, Mary realized that Jesus was not with her , and went to search for him and found him in the Temple. Mary asked him why did he make them so worried by staying at the Temple and Jesus replied 'Did you not know I had to be in my Father's house?'. This shows that from an early age , Jesus knew his identity as the Son of God and that he believed the Temple was God's dwelling place.

    • Length: 1944 words
  17. Reviewing my Christian service charity activity.My Christian service was at the Markham Food Bank near Main Street, Unionville.

    I gave the same type of effort and care into the poor people who needed my help, essentially making them a part of my "extended family." I tried demonstrating compassion and love towards them through my hard put effort in organizing, packaging, and sorting an assortment of different food for them. I also contributed to the common good by helping these poor people. In modern society, most people would bypass on the less fortunate people of our communities without offering any aid.

    • Length: 908 words
  18. The speech event, Christian Wedding afternoon ceremony, was held at the hall of the Union Church at 2:45 p.m on 12th March 2011. It is a highly formal ritual that demonstrates a sense of sacredness when a series of ceremonial acts are performed to assist

    The most important fulfillment of such heavenly wedding ceremony, the exchange of vows and rings as well as the lit of the Unity Candle, however, is embedded in between so as to display its reliance on God's blessings. Nonetheless, each activity in the wedding ceremony contributes to the overall success of the formal function. The instrumentalities accompany the performance of a sequence of actions held in the wedding ceremony both linguistically and non-linguistically.

    • Length: 510 words
  19. With reference to other aspects of human experience, explore the view that miracles are difficult to explain. Justify your answer.

    Another problem that may arise in explaining what miracles are is how valid a miracle is. Some believe that even the smallest things in life are miracles, but there are others who would rebuke such a claim, believing only big events to be real miracles. There is no real agreed way of proving what is or is not a miracle, although the Catholic Church has tried to work around this.

    • Length: 591 words
  20. Outline your knowledge and understanding of the main characteristics and structure of the Acts of the Apostles

    From the start of the book until chapter 6, the Apostles are situated "in Jerusalem" and from then to chapter 12 is the story of how the Apostles fled Jerusalem and went out to "Judea and Samaria". From Chapter 12 onwards chronicles the missionary journeys and the road to Rome, which was considered by many to be "the ends of the earth" at the time. The biographical theme is one that has caused many of scholars to dispute the title of the book, for although the book is titled "Acts of the Apostles", the book mainly centres around two figures.

    • Length: 1171 words
  21. Describe the teachings of the religion of which you are studying about the relationship between humanity and the rest of creation.

    at a perfect temperature, however, a build up of carbon dioxide from sources such as cars, is causing the layers surrounding the Earth to get thicker so more heat is being trapped causing the temperature to rise. Temperature rise will cause polar ice caps to melt and sea levels to increase causing flooding, storms and hurricanes, resulting in loss of human life. Christianity's teachings on humanity's responsibility for the environment seem to be having little effect as the world is facing huge problems.

    • Length: 1069 words
  22. Catholic Social Teaching

    Whilst it is not the Church's responsibility to provide a blueprint for Government policy, the Catholic Church's teachings on social justice are central if the Government is to make savings without infringing on human dignity. The Church puts forward many principles on Catholic Social teaching, however the subsequent essay aims to deal with three of these: human dignity, the community/common good, and finally a preferential option for the poor and vulnerable. These principles have their roots in the fundamental teachings of the Catholic Church.

    • Length: 1555 words
  23. Key people

    In Luke's gospel, one key person who is called to faith is Simon. Jesus, in the call of the first fishermen asked the disciples to put out their boats. They did as Jesus commanded and a great catch of fish occurs. Simon falls to his knees and said, "Depart from me Lord for I am a sinful man." Simon's response is like that of Patrick who also bowed down in humility. He is shown as one with great faith and as a key person in Luke's gospel as he left his nets and followed Jesus.

    • Length: 1296 words
  24. To get to heaven you must behave morally. Discuss.

    From the viewpoint of determinism we are unable to behave morally as we are already pre-determined in our behaviour. This can be justified from both religious and scientific viewpoints. An omniscient and omnipotent God creates determinism by definition. If he knows what we are going to do, and has the capability to prevent it, then we are never truly free. Such hard determinism can also be seen in a non-religious context such as the belief of behaviourism, were we are forever determined by our environment and have no freedom or dignity to act within such constraints. The Christian view is the most dominant one that would agree with this statement.

    • Length: 1052 words
  25. Life after death and problem of evil

    For him this was enough to justify why evil existed, as for those who had faced such would be rewarded in heaven and the persecutors would be punished. Many problems arise with this argument, specifically can you attribute moral evil to man holding him responsible for his actions? There exists in the world of both science and religion the belief that we are determined through God or genetics, and that we cannot always be held responsible for actions. Augustine however refuted this claim arguing that an omnipotent God did not crate evil, we did.

    • Length: 1192 words

Conclusion analysis

Good conclusions usually refer back to the question or title and address it directly - for example by using key words from the title.
How well do you think these conclusions address the title or question? Answering these questions should help you find out.

  1. Do they use key words from the title or question?
  2. Do they answer the question directly?
  3. Can you work out the question or title just by reading the conclusion?
  • Discuss and assess the view that according to the author of Lukes gospel it was Jesus conflict with the religious rather than political authorities which led to his crucifixion

    "In conclusion, there was conflict between both the political and the religious authorities yet it was the conflict with the religious authorities which ultimately led to Jesus' crucifixion. Jesus experienced more clashes with the religious authorities rather than the political and the religious authorities had much more reasons to accuse Jesus and condemn him. It was the religious authorities which put Jesus on trial in the Sanhedrin and accused him of blasphemy and they were the ones who brought Jesus to Pilate and accused him of treasonable act. Without the religious authorities Jesus might have never even faced Pilate nor got arrested. However, in a historical sense Jesus died as a matter of religious and political expediency. It could also be argued that it was ultimately God who paved the way for Jesus' crucifixion since it was God's plan. "The dying Jesus is the evidence of God's anger toward sin; but the living Jesus is the proof of God's love and forgiveness." ~Lorenz Eifert"

  • For a Christian euthanasia can never be a good death. Discuss

    "Overall, after looking at each article, and establishing each persons view on euthanasia, I have come to mine own conclusion. I disagree with the claim, and agree with the likes of Badham and Fletcher. Firstly, if the sanctity of life is most important, Christian should not let himself or herself or a loved one suffer from an incurable illness. If they deemed their life the most important thing in life, then they would save themselves and consider euthanasia as an option. Jenny Appleton agrees with the claim and says that euthanasia/suicide would become the first step towards state control of the right to life. But is this a bad thing? It could in fact give humans more control of the right to life and death, if they are very ill. Taking all of the thoughts I have pointed out, I think it is hard to establish why euthanasia would not be appropriate for a Christian. It's the more loving option and stops the suffering of a person. However, a modern problem is that this modern world calls for a Christian response that is already modern. (The ethic of love) Carmen Barlow Essay 1 Richard Dunn R.S"

  • Discuss and assess the view that according to the author of Lukes gospel it was Jesus conflict with the religious rather than political authorities which led to his crucifixion

    "In conclusion, there was conflict between both the political and the religious authorities yet it was the conflict with the religious authorities which ultimately led to Jesus' crucifixion. Jesus experienced more clashes with the religious authorities rather than the political and the religious authorities had much more reasons to accuse Jesus and condemn him. It was the religious authorities which put Jesus on trial in the Sanhedrin and accused him of blasphemy and they were the ones who brought Jesus to Pilate and accused him of treasonable act. Without the religious authorities Jesus might have never even faced Pilate nor got arrested. However, in a historical sense Jesus died as a matter of religious and political expediency. It could also be argued that it was ultimately God who paved the way for Jesus' crucifixion since it was God's plan. "The dying Jesus is the evidence of God's anger toward sin; but the living Jesus is the proof of God's love and forgiveness." ~Lorenz Eifert"

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