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AS and A Level: Christianity

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  1. Examine why the writers of the synoptic gospels edited the material they used.

    Another important event that occurred in Jesus' life was the Bar Mitzvah- the coming of age. This is where Jesus goes to the temple at the age of twelve. "They found him in the temple sitting with the Jewish teachers, listening to them, and asking questions. All who heard him were amazed at his intelligent answers..." (Luke 2:46-47). Luke was acknowledged as doctor, and it was occasionally proposed the author of Luke has particular interest in the diagnosis of illness. Luke tends to be more sympathetic than Mark to the work of doctors. It becomes noticeable in the story of how Jesus cured women with an incurable disease.

    • Word count: 1070
  2. Outline and examine Jesus attitudes concerning wealth and the poor. To what extent do these teachings depart from Judaism?

    What Caird suggests is that from the tale the rich man at the end begs Abraham for Lazarus to go tell his brothers to not do what he has done, but Caird says that this is because he has failed at his opportunities, so he does not want the same to happen to the rest of his family. Another attitude of Jesus is that wealth is not a bad thing, but it should always be used in the right way though.

    • Word count: 1504
  3. Outline the arguments for the dependency of morality and religion

    Kant said there must be "a holy author of the world who makes possible the highest good'. In a sense, God allows us to reach our most perfect sense, at the point at which we die and enter the afterlife. If it is this holy author that allows one to be moral, and this holy author is God, there is a clear dependency on religion for morality. People are often held to a higher standard than that which a large proportion of humanity can claim to have themselves, and this is because this higher standard is what we consider to be moral, and this comes from God.

    • Word count: 1327
  4. Explain how God is shown in the Bible as a Creator

    For example, God did not create all life, but neither did we, so we should still treat it as someone else's property. The very first account of Creation is told in Genesis 1:1-3. In this 7-Day story, God creates all of the heavens and the earth, the land and the seas, the fish and the birds and man and woman. Everything is good in this world, it is all intentionally created and Adam and Eve live peacefully in the Garden, in dominance of the Animals and the land, with but one limitation, which is not to eat the Fruit of the Tree of Knowledge of Good and Evil.

    • Word count: 1003
  5. Discuss and assess the view that according to the author of Lukes gospel it was Jesus conflict with the religious rather than political authorities which led to his crucifixion

    They had limited powers and intervened mainly in religious issues. The Political authorities were the Romans who ruled over Israel at that time. The ultimate leader of the Roman Empire was Caesar who had many powerful people that worked under him ruling provinces such as Herod and Pilate. The Romans had the ultimate power to put someone to death. The government practiced one of the first 'one country, two systems' policy, everyone had religious and political freedom yet the Romans maintained strict control.

    • Word count: 1664
  6. The Gospel was written to prove to non-believers that Jesus Christ is the Son of God Examine this claim regarding the purpose of Lukes Gospel.

    Jesus and his family had gone to the Temple in Jerusalem for Passover when Jesus was 12. On the way back, Mary realized that Jesus was not with her , and went to search for him and found him in the Temple. Mary asked him why did he make them so worried by staying at the Temple and Jesus replied 'Did you not know I had to be in my Father's house?'. This shows that from an early age , Jesus knew his identity as the Son of God and that he believed the Temple was God's dwelling place.

    • Word count: 1944
  7. Outline your knowledge and understanding of the main characteristics and structure of the Acts of the Apostles

    From the start of the book until chapter 6, the Apostles are situated "in Jerusalem" and from then to chapter 12 is the story of how the Apostles fled Jerusalem and went out to "Judea and Samaria". From Chapter 12 onwards chronicles the missionary journeys and the road to Rome, which was considered by many to be "the ends of the earth" at the time. The biographical theme is one that has caused many of scholars to dispute the title of the book, for although the book is titled "Acts of the Apostles", the book mainly centres around two figures.

    • Word count: 1171
  8. Describe the teachings of the religion of which you are studying about the relationship between humanity and the rest of creation.

    at a perfect temperature, however, a build up of carbon dioxide from sources such as cars, is causing the layers surrounding the Earth to get thicker so more heat is being trapped causing the temperature to rise. Temperature rise will cause polar ice caps to melt and sea levels to increase causing flooding, storms and hurricanes, resulting in loss of human life. Christianity's teachings on humanity's responsibility for the environment seem to be having little effect as the world is facing huge problems.

    • Word count: 1069
  9. Catholic Social Teaching

    Whilst it is not the Church's responsibility to provide a blueprint for Government policy, the Catholic Church's teachings on social justice are central if the Government is to make savings without infringing on human dignity. The Church puts forward many principles on Catholic Social teaching, however the subsequent essay aims to deal with three of these: human dignity, the community/common good, and finally a preferential option for the poor and vulnerable. These principles have their roots in the fundamental teachings of the Catholic Church.

    • Word count: 1555
  10. Key people

    In Luke's gospel, one key person who is called to faith is Simon. Jesus, in the call of the first fishermen asked the disciples to put out their boats. They did as Jesus commanded and a great catch of fish occurs. Simon falls to his knees and said, "Depart from me Lord for I am a sinful man." Simon's response is like that of Patrick who also bowed down in humility. He is shown as one with great faith and as a key person in Luke's gospel as he left his nets and followed Jesus.

    • Word count: 1296
  11. To get to heaven you must behave morally. Discuss.

    From the viewpoint of determinism we are unable to behave morally as we are already pre-determined in our behaviour. This can be justified from both religious and scientific viewpoints. An omniscient and omnipotent God creates determinism by definition. If he knows what we are going to do, and has the capability to prevent it, then we are never truly free. Such hard determinism can also be seen in a non-religious context such as the belief of behaviourism, were we are forever determined by our environment and have no freedom or dignity to act within such constraints. The Christian view is the most dominant one that would agree with this statement.

    • Word count: 1052
  12. Life after death and problem of evil

    For him this was enough to justify why evil existed, as for those who had faced such would be rewarded in heaven and the persecutors would be punished. Many problems arise with this argument, specifically can you attribute moral evil to man holding him responsible for his actions? There exists in the world of both science and religion the belief that we are determined through God or genetics, and that we cannot always be held responsible for actions. Augustine however refuted this claim arguing that an omnipotent God did not crate evil, we did.

    • Word count: 1192
  13. A2 Religious Std Authorship of the Fourth Gospel

    There are various strong external evidences (i.e. implied and indirect evidence which cannot be quoted from the bible) pointing in favour of the Gospel authorship being an apostle, someone who knew Jesus. Smalley points to one of Irenaeus, Bishop of Lyons' work Against Heresies where Irenaeus personally states that the "witness" behind the Fourth Gospel was "John the disciple of Lord". Irenaeus believes that John might have delivered the Gospel to the elders in Ephesus before he deceased hence allowing it to be passed on.

    • Word count: 1103
  14. Science Challenges Religion

    However there are others who believe that science and religion can co-exist without disproving each other or challenging their beliefs. Those that do believe this do so because though they believe that the universe was created through the Big Bang they also believe that God was the one who started and caused the Big Bang. Stephen Jay Gould once said, 'Science covers the area: what is the universe made of (fact) and why does it work (theory). Religion deals with questions of meaning and right and wrong.

    • Word count: 1199
  15. Manasseh, the King of Judah

    There were a couple of invasions of Judah during this time by Sennacherib, the king of Assyria. On each of these occasions the Lord used Hezekiah and Isaiah to protect Jerusalem. Although almost all of the land of Judah was devastated by the Assyrians, the capital city was preserved. Isaiah said that "Jerusalem looked like a caretaker's hut in the midst of a cucumber field"; all of the fortified cities had been destroyed but Jerusalem. It was Hezekiah's wise leadership that made possible the preservation of the city and its people. He was a powerful spiritual force in Judah.

    • Word count: 1554
  16. Compare and contrast the key features of Natural Moral Law & Virtue Ethics

    A person acts virtuously if they possess and live the virtues. 4. A virtue is a moral characteristic that a person needs to live well. Aristotle, widely considered to be the founder of virtue ethics, devised in his work 'Nicomachean Ethics' that there are twelve moral virtues which fall between two vices. Vices are two extremes, for example there is a vice of deficiency for something and a vice of excess. The virtuous mean or 'Golden Mean' is the mid-way point or balance between each vice.

    • Word count: 1649
  17. Human Experience Miracles

    Through the study of these miracles, it is easy to see that universalism is a main characteristic of Luke's gospel, as in every miracle, it is the outcast, the marginalised, who is healed. Jesus often paired the healing with forgiveness of sins. There are many Holy sites throughout the world, that are renowned for the miracles that have taken place there, such as Lourdes, Fatima, and Knock. Lourdes is probably the most visited of these sites, garnering over 200 million pilgrims every year.

    • Word count: 1132
  18. Describe One Miracle Particular to Luke, and another of a different type.

    Through the miracles, the gospel writer is trying to show the authority of Jesus as Messiah, how God's power is at work. In these stories it is not only physical healing we find, but also spiritual healing through the forgiveness of sins. In the time of Jesus, pain and suffering had no remedies, and illness was often seen as punishment from God. Therefore, through the miracles, we see that Jesus challenged these thoughts, and practices against the sick. We can also see that Jesus was always compassionate to anyone in need and his concern to alleviate ailments in life.

    • Word count: 1629
  19. With Reference to other aspects of Human Experience explore the claim that there will always be conflict between Religion and State.

    There will be loud wailing throughout Egypt-worse than there has ever been or ever will be again. But among the Israelites not a dog will bark at any man or animal.' Then you will know that the Lord makes a distinction between Egypt and Israel. All these officials of yours will come to me, bowing down before me and saying, 'Go, you and all the people who follow you!' After that I will leave." After the Pharaoh found his son had died following the final plague, he said, "Up!

    • Word count: 1738
  20. Critically assess the view that the two Patrick theory solves the puzzle of Patrick

    The beginning point for a Christian mission is the reference of Prosper of Aquitaine to the sending of Palladius in 431. This date not only marks the beginning of the official introduction of Christianity into Ireland, but it also marks the beginning of Irish history as a whole. No other date apart from this one regarding Christianity in Ireland is certain. It was while he was studying the annals that Thomas O'Rahilly noticed the recorded death dates of the accepted contemporaries of Patrick in the sixth century annals, for example Mochta.

    • Word count: 1288
  21. Outline and explain the issues included in uncovering the historical Patrick (30 Marks)

    S´┐Żan MacAirt refers to the fifth century as the "lost century", because of the absence of any historical information. We are still in the era of pre-history, which the exception of Patrick's writings, and Prosper's reference to the arrival of Palladius. Within these two documents, which are of the utmost importance, there are only two place names given to us, and no dates, so it is very hard to gather historical fact. O'Rahilly rightly says of humble Patrick "the last thing that the saint could have imagined, would be that hundreds of years later, the document would be scrutinised again and again with a view to gleaning biographical details of the writer's life."

    • Word count: 1650
  22. Outline the cosmological argument for the existance of God. and plan.

    This mover is often called the prime mover. Aquinas said 'this everyone understands to be God' Aquinas' second way is very similar to his first identifying an 'efficient cause' for everything in the universe. He says that nothing can cause itself as it would have had to exist before it existed and that is impossible. He says that there must therefore be a first 'efficient cause' which caused everything. And again attributes this role to God. In his third way he describes the existence of 'necessary being', this relies on the theory that all beings that exist, can not exist, and therefore there must have been a time when nothing existed.

    • Word count: 1648
  23. Why were the signs so controversial at that time? John uses the term Semeia meaning signs, to describe the miracles Jesus performed.

    So therefore in all of Jesus' signs this was a common controversial factor that made it hard for the Jews to believe. Another controversial element to the signs is that, in all of the signs, Jesus is demonstrating that Christianity has come to supersede Judaism. Of course to Jews this would have been very difficult to accept, but nonetheless this message is put across many times in all the signs. In the wedding in Cana, Jesus' mother Mary was present.

    • Word count: 1181
  24. Why are the I AM sayings so controversial? Exodus 3: 14 says God said to Moses, "I am who I am.

    By Jesus saying that he is the "bread of life", he is showing himself to be heavenly, and sent by God just like the Manna. Tasker describes that, "This bread which alone can permanently satisfy the spiritual hunger and thirst of men cannot be merely had for the asking... it is only available for those who are drawn by the father to the Son, who see the Son for who he really is and who commit themselves to him". This is controversial to the Jews as it suggests that it is only through the bread, Jesus, that eternal life can be gained.

    • Word count: 1428
  25. Lutheran Religion

    They refer to God as the Trinity believing the Father, Son and Holy Spirit are all God. In addition to believing in the Trinity, both believe Jesus is the son of God sent by God to become human like us. It is believed that in Jesus' life and being he lived in perfect obedience to his Father's will. However, due to the sake of the sinful world, he was condemned to death on the cross, but death could not contain him. On the third day after his execution he arose again and appeared as the living Lord.

    • Word count: 1181

Conclusion analysis

Good conclusions usually refer back to the question or title and address it directly - for example by using key words from the title.
How well do you think these conclusions address the title or question? Answering these questions should help you find out.

  1. Do they use key words from the title or question?
  2. Do they answer the question directly?
  3. Can you work out the question or title just by reading the conclusion?
  • Discuss and assess the view that according to the author of Lukes gospel it was Jesus conflict with the religious rather than political authorities which led to his crucifixion

    "In conclusion, there was conflict between both the political and the religious authorities yet it was the conflict with the religious authorities which ultimately led to Jesus' crucifixion. Jesus experienced more clashes with the religious authorities rather than the political and the religious authorities had much more reasons to accuse Jesus and condemn him. It was the religious authorities which put Jesus on trial in the Sanhedrin and accused him of blasphemy and they were the ones who brought Jesus to Pilate and accused him of treasonable act. Without the religious authorities Jesus might have never even faced Pilate nor got arrested. However, in a historical sense Jesus died as a matter of religious and political expediency. It could also be argued that it was ultimately God who paved the way for Jesus' crucifixion since it was God's plan. "The dying Jesus is the evidence of God's anger toward sin; but the living Jesus is the proof of God's love and forgiveness." ~Lorenz Eifert"

  • For a Christian euthanasia can never be a good death. Discuss

    "Overall, after looking at each article, and establishing each persons view on euthanasia, I have come to mine own conclusion. I disagree with the claim, and agree with the likes of Badham and Fletcher. Firstly, if the sanctity of life is most important, Christian should not let himself or herself or a loved one suffer from an incurable illness. If they deemed their life the most important thing in life, then they would save themselves and consider euthanasia as an option. Jenny Appleton agrees with the claim and says that euthanasia/suicide would become the first step towards state control of the right to life. But is this a bad thing? It could in fact give humans more control of the right to life and death, if they are very ill. Taking all of the thoughts I have pointed out, I think it is hard to establish why euthanasia would not be appropriate for a Christian. It's the more loving option and stops the suffering of a person. However, a modern problem is that this modern world calls for a Christian response that is already modern. (The ethic of love) Carmen Barlow Essay 1 Richard Dunn R.S"

  • Discuss and assess the view that according to the author of Lukes gospel it was Jesus conflict with the religious rather than political authorities which led to his crucifixion

    "In conclusion, there was conflict between both the political and the religious authorities yet it was the conflict with the religious authorities which ultimately led to Jesus' crucifixion. Jesus experienced more clashes with the religious authorities rather than the political and the religious authorities had much more reasons to accuse Jesus and condemn him. It was the religious authorities which put Jesus on trial in the Sanhedrin and accused him of blasphemy and they were the ones who brought Jesus to Pilate and accused him of treasonable act. Without the religious authorities Jesus might have never even faced Pilate nor got arrested. However, in a historical sense Jesus died as a matter of religious and political expediency. It could also be argued that it was ultimately God who paved the way for Jesus' crucifixion since it was God's plan. "The dying Jesus is the evidence of God's anger toward sin; but the living Jesus is the proof of God's love and forgiveness." ~Lorenz Eifert"

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