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does universial morality exist?

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Introduction

8. To understand something you need to rely on your own experience and culture. Does this mean that it is impossible to have objective knowledge? For instance one could ask the question: Is there such a thing as universal morality? Universal morality. Is that equivalent to the concept of rules and regulations? Our morality seems to very often stem from the regulations set by the leaders of a state or country. This is how we come upon our own justifications. However these rules must have derived from something else. What was the original stimulus of morality, and is this knowledge humans have of morality objective? This is going to be the main question of my discussion. This essay will then touch upon the possibilities of an objective morality through reasoning with Absolutism and Immanuel Kant's Ethics. It will then move on to the counter argument, the possibilities of an objective morality not existing by reasoning with Moral Relativism and Albert Camus' works on existentialism. ...read more.

Middle

We then do not steal because it would make us feel guilty for doing something bad. This same statement applies to lying. Kant therefore insists that humans are striving for the highest good in life and in that case must carry our duty as humans by avoiding going against objective moral laws, like lying. I think that universal morality could be true because there does seem to be a correlation between the laws and morals of different cultures around the world. However this theory can be seen as weak, because there is no way of completely proving objective moral laws. Many people disagree with it because it proposes that humans do not have the freedom to make their own decisions defeating the possibility of objective knowledge. On the other hand, possibilities of universal morality existing is just as great. Moral relativism suggests that moral values are applicable only within certain cultural boundaries or within an individual. ...read more.

Conclusion

On the other hand I do believe that we have the opportunity to have objective knowledge, although our experience may not be original our decisions are still personal, therefore objective knowledge does exist. Objective knowledge involves having your own suggestions and opinions. Existentialism is a fine example of permitting the existence of objective knowledge however I think it may be taking it a step too far, it seems impossible for a society to survive if people only followed what they believed to be right and disagreed on everything else. In my opinion objective knowledge is as much of a commoditiy as any of our daily essencials that define what us humans are. With out a desire to have a choice or personal opinion on what you know (objective knowledge) our spieces would be dull and boring, we also would not be the advanced thinkers we are today. Alex Liu Philosophy HL ...read more.

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