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Evolution V teleological Argument

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Introduction

The evolution argument goes against the existence on God claiming the existence of the universe and everything within was because of evolution derived from Charles Darwin's Theory of evolution. It is also supported by followers of Richard Dawkins. Religious believers are of the teleological argument and believe that God created the universe and everything in it but this is much open to criticisms evolution believers as they argue there is no proof for the existence of God and they argue that where did God come from and who made God? Teleological believers argue that God was necessary has all ways been there and the universe is contingent. ...read more.

Middle

They argue that the first cell could not have just appeared and there must have been something which created the first cell. This again supports the existence of God and the design argument. The creator of the theory of evolution Charles Darwin studied live forms for a majority of years and he believed that human life has existed for hundreds of million of years and that creatures have evolved considerably due to natural selection which cause the fittest and most adapted to the environment characteristics are passed on to the offspring. For example giraffes would have been small at first but the ones with the longer next survived best as they were able to get the most and the best leaves and this was then passed on the offspring over generation now making giraffes have longer necks. ...read more.

Conclusion

e.g seventy, or seven hundred million years and they can also argue that evolution existed but it was under the control of God. To conclude I believe that the teleological argument is the strongest argument as there are stronger arguments to support this claim that God created the universe and the main arguments of the evolution theory can be counted and cannot be explained without a God. Like the fact that there was one cell which creatures evolved from Aquinas would have argued there must have been a first causes to cause the creation or existence of the first cell thus being God. Also it can be argued that evolution was under the control of God the whole time undermining the existence of an evolution theory. ...read more.

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