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Explain what is meant by moral absolutism.

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Introduction

a) Explain what is meant by moral absolutism? Moral absolutism is the ethical theory which believes that there are always absolute rules of which moral questions can be judged against. It means that certain actions are either right or wrong. Moral absolutists will judge the actions of those who steal, child abuse, murder etc. as being absolutely immorally wrong, regardless of ones belief or ones situation therefore making it impersonal. It is based on the deontological argument, people are led on a set of rules which people must obey. These pay no regard to exceptions and are set in stone. Moral absolutism adapts the theory that certain actions are either right or that they are wrong, regardless of when or why they happened to begin with. ...read more.

Middle

Rather than moral relativism where everything changes according to the situation it's put up against. It provides safety to mankind because justice would always been made because the laws always stay the same no matter what. For example, if the previous situation was based on moral relativism then the person who killed the other would be let free without a punishment because they weren't the one who initiated the attack. Then how can you say justice has been made, when someone has just gotten away with murder, purely because of the situation it was up against? Absolutism has no room to manoeuvre, it is the fixed truth and can never be manipulated. The famous philosopher Louis Pojan, who lived from 1935-2005, emphasises that a moral absolutist does not have to believe that all moral laws are universally ...read more.

Conclusion

They pay no regard to the type of situation and have been around since beginning of Christianity. Rules such as ?Thou shall not bear false witness? and ?Thou shall not steal? are one of the main rules that they follow. We can clearly understand from this that all the rules are generic and do not take a personal attack over something in particular. We also know absolute rules are based on 'a priori' events, which basically means that they are not dependant on a given experience but contain a logically necessary conclusion. The consequences of our actions are irrelevant to whether they are right or wrong. Evil actions may accidentally have good outcomes whereas acting heroically could actually result in a worse outcome. Moral absolutism is much easier to apply than moral relativism because the laws and actions will always stay the same. ...read more.

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