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Identify key ideas associated with the problem of suffering. Examine two solutions to the problem of suffering.

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Introduction

The problem of evil. 1) Identify key ideas associated with the problem of suffering. Examine two solutions to the problem of suffering. To unravel this question and to find solutions we first of all need to know what evil is, why it exists and what kinds of evil there is. We wake up everyday to hear about evil around the world, people being murdered, people dyeing in the result of an earthquake but do we know what kinds of evil they are when we hear about them? ...read more.

Middle

Other examples of Natural evil would be volcanoes, earthquakes, disease, and tsunamis. On the other hand this is an evil of which can be controlled and is used by people who chose to do this damage to other people. Murder, rape, abuse, torture are all examples of Moral evil, a good example would also be the 9/11 in New York. Evil is an objective reality, this means that it is simply to difficult to reject its existence as we speak about evil, listen and hear about it on the television, we hear it everywhere around the world, this is why we find it hard to reject its existence. ...read more.

Conclusion

If God could do anything, if he was all powerful and all loving then evil should not exist. The problem of evil proves otherwise. A man named John Mackie formed and inconsistent to explain the problem further. He claimed that 3 statements on the triad cannot be true, 'Evil exists', 'God is all loving' and 'God is all powerful/omnipotent'. Is there a convincing solution to the problem of evil? For many years philosophers and critics have been arguing over the problem of evil and suffering and how it relates to God. So many philosophers who have come up with their own theodicy have argued the reasons they believe that it exists. ...read more.

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