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Kants Theory cannot be used to make decisions about abortion. Discuss.

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Introduction

Kant?s Theory cannot be used to make decisions about abortion I will be discussing the above statement by discussing the reasons in support of the statement and reasons that are not in support of the statement Firstly some may say that Kant?s theory cannot be used to make decisions about abortion as Kant does not recognise moral dilemmas. A dictionary definition of a moral dilemma is this - ?A moral dilemma is a complex situation that often involves an apparent mental conflict between moral imperatives, in which to obey one would result in transgressing another?. ...read more.

Middle

By contrast others may disagree with the above statement as they believe that by using Kant?s theory they will be able to make a straight forward decision which does not involve emotions and confusion to contribute to the decision made. Kant believed that all moral decisions could be made from his ideas about categorical imperatives: ?Act only on that maxim whereby thou canst at the same time will that it should become a universal law?, in other words, if you want to decide whether an act is morally good, then you should be able to see if everyone else would do that act in the same way (if the act is universal). ...read more.

Conclusion

Kant?s reasoning behind his ideas would be that if it?s right or wrong for one person it should be right or wrong for everyone. So by looking at it this way people will be able to make the correct decision without the need to confine to emotions. In conclusion I believe that Kant theory can be useful but only to a certain extent. This is because if it can be applied to make moral decisions without the factor of emotions to contribute to it, however when looking at something such as abortion which is so controversial and emotional it is very hard to consolidate to only Kant?s reasoning?s. Shobika Gomahan ...read more.

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