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Morals codes distinguish between order and chaos and good and evil.

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Introduction

Morals codes distinguish between order and chaos and good and evil. Moral codes provide us with ways to make ethical decisions of our actions which determines either stability or destruction of our individual life, community, and/or society. The moral codes by which we live and survive life enables society to progress in an organized and reasonable fashion. However, ethics, an area of knowledge, possess many problems of knowledge because moral codes by which humans live are not always upheld due to human nature. Moral codes change from culture to culture thus causing conflicts between people and uncertainty of what is moral. We should follow moral codes in order to survive, have order in society, and prosper, however; moral relativism and human nature causes the problems of knowledge in the area of knowledge of ethics. We must follow moral codes to have order in society. For example, a man, who desired to give his daughter her most wanted Christmas gift, robbed a toy store and was later arrested and put in jail. Our morals help us identify the man's actions as ethically wrong. ...read more.

Middle

This is when moral relativism comes into play and causes conflicts within the area of knowledge of ethics. Moral codes vary from culture to culture. A person or group may disobey certain laws because according to them the law does not uphold their moral code, which in turn makes their disobedience of law ethical (Singer 303). For example, Gandhi marched and fasted to relieve oppression of his fellow Indians. However, many people were killed in the process. To the Indians the British were immoral for their oppressive ways and to the British the Indians were immoral for breaking their laws. In Gandhi's case the outcome was a positive societal change. However, civil disobedience, which is inspired by immorality, may sometimes cause more problems than in the beginning because domino affects may take place meaning more and more people may start disobeying more laws because every law might seem unjust to someone. Another instance, Alcohol was outlawed during the 1920s. People who want to quit drinking need alcohol because they must gradually drink less and less instead of completely stopping at one time. ...read more.

Conclusion

However, both types of students must attend class and work together. Problems arise because it is unfair for students who follow their moral code to study and learn their material rather than the students who cheat to make higher grades. However, everyone will not follow their moral codes because it is human nature. Human nature is a problem of knowledge within ethics. We do not wear our seat belts sometimes or perhaps speed everyday because we as humans are not perfect, however; without moral codes we would be lost in our everyday lives because we base our actions and decisions on our moral codes of ethics. Ethics is huge part of our everyday lives. We unconsciously base our decisions on what is right or wrong through our moral codes. We must follow moral codes because society would be in complete disarray and unable to proceed. Secondly, without moral codes, we as humans would not be able to survive our crimes against one another because there would be no laws. Thirdly, moral codes provide us with ways to prosper as individuals and progress in society. Ethics conflict and ever changes from individual to individual and culture to culture, nevertheless; ethics is necessary for us to survive, move forward and prosper in our lives. ...read more.

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