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The "Allegory of the Cave" represents an extended metaphor in which human beings perceive and deem as reality.

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Introduction

´╗┐Sunny Solanki Professor Kerry Ybarra Philosophy 1A January 15, 2013 1. The "Allegory of the Cave" represents an extended metaphor in which human beings perceive and deem as reality. The thesis behind this allegory represents the basic tenants that we all perceive as imperfect reflections represents truth and reality. In the notorious storyline, Plato establishes the scene where prisoners are chained down and compelled to look up at the front wall. The multi-faceted meanings of the story can be seen from the cave in which prisoners are chained down unable to turn their heads around. The allegory not only represents the misconceptions we encounter with reality, but what a true leader of a clan should be. ...read more.

Middle

The prisoners watch shadows projected on the front wall by the fire where they try to ascribe some type of Form to them. According to Plato, these shadows represent the close encounter of reality that prisoners are most likely to attain. According to Plato, the prisoner who was dragged into the sunshine was like a philosopher who tried to fathom and distinguish reality from factitious things. The prisoner comes to understand that the shadows on the wall were utter nonsense that do not make up reality at all, as he experienced the true form of reality in the sunshine. 3. The prisoners who were ignorant of the realm of reality behind them, saw the prisoner who was released, as a ridiculous and corrupt man. ...read more.

Conclusion

The prisoner tries to be the superior leader in his clan trying to delve his subjects in the ultimate form of reality while ignoring the shadows of the wall that don't represent anything. Plato seems to commend the treatment of the enlightened prisoner at the hands of the other inmates in the cave to try to enlighten them and reason with them the different facets of reality. 5. To the prisoners, the ultimate source of truth does not come from the divine truth, but from the shadows of the images. According to the prisoners, these shadows convey a message they can fathom because they have experienced these shadows their entire life. They do not accept the prisoner's enlightened treaties because they never experienced the different perspectives of reality. ...read more.

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