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What is meant by the term miracle and examine and comment on the view that arguments against miracles are stronger than those arguments in support of them.

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Introduction

What is meant by the term "miracle" and examine and comment on the view that arguments against miracles are stronger than those arguments in support of them. Paul Tilich describes a miracle as "An event which is astonishing, unusual, shaking, without contradicting the rational structure of reality ... an even which points to the mystery of being" Miracles are a religious term, they are divine acts of God, and can be explained in no other way, a miracle must contain three basic attributes: The experience must be against regular experience or "break the laws of nature"; the event has purpose and meaning; it is possible to ascribe religious significance to the event. Thomas Aquinas suggested that miracles were "those things ... which as done by divine power apart from the order generally followed in things" He proposed three categories of miracles: Events done by God which nature could never do; Events that God can do and nature could do but not in that order; Events done by God that nature can do but God does without the use of natural laws. ...read more.

Middle

Some may call this a miracle; others may call it a coincidence. The only problem with Holland's suggestion is that it makes a miracle based on the subjective views of the witness. I will also look at the significance of Miracles in a religious context. Richard Swinburne says "If a God intervened in the natural order to make a feather land here rather than there for no deep, ultimate purpose, or to upset a child's box of toys just for spite, these events would not naturally be described as miracles" Although many miracles seem to be without purpose, like the liquefying of the blood of St Januarius. Or the statues of the Hindu Gods drinking milk seen al over India, this is a pointless miracle. John Locke argued that the definition of a miracle must be seen in a broader context of who performs it and who sees it; he said that a person must be acknowledgeable by God, and that the messenger should have come from God. ...read more.

Conclusion

Thirdly he observed miracle stories to some from unreliable sources, most coming from religious believers and the bible alike. Hardly unbiased sources and therefore not reliable sources for a just argument. Lastly we can see his last view through Illiyaas Ali's view of an inconsistent triad. This works of a basis of looking at the possibilities of miracles, it says that either: miracles occur; miracles are claimed in all religions and religions clam exclusively. Neither can occur without the contraries being incorrect. There has been much criticism over Hume's observations. We can judge Hume's description of natural laws, as they are still being understood, so, with all today's scientific advances, how can we judge what goes against natural laws or not? Next we can look at the language that Hume uses, his argument is open to widely differing interpretations, he seems to suggest that the improbability of an event leads to the logical conclusion that it did not happen. But some would say that this very improbability makes it even more believable than God willed it so. He also does not say what constitutes to a valid amount of witnesses to a miracle. ?? ?? ?? ?? Roshan Ratnayaka ...read more.

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