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Affects of Inter and Intra Specific Competition between Wheat and Mustard plants

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Introduction

Ahsum Khan AD Bio C Period 10/14/09 Affects of Inter and Intra Specific Competition between Wheat and Mustard plants Abstract: A study was conducted to address the problem if interspecific competition occurs between mustard and wheat plants; and if intraspecific competition occurs within the plant species of mustard and wheat. It has hypothesized if plants of different or the same species are planted within vicinity of one another that there is a possibility of competition between them then competition will occur and one of the competitors will eventually be eliminated from that specific location. Intraspecific competition was explored for wheat and mustard plants by varying the density of plants per pot, from 2 seeds to 34 seeds. Interspecific competition was explored for wheat and mustard plants by planting several mixtures of the two species in the same pot. In addition, "control" pots containing only one plant (wheat or mustard) were planted, as well. After six weeks of occasional (daily to weekly) watering, and constant sunlight (except at night), the plants were analyzed for results (number of individuals and total biomass). Finding did not support the original hypothesis, due to the fact of interspecific competition did not eliminate the opposing species, and intraspecific competition did not eliminate the opposing competitors of the same species. ...read more.

Middle

2) Make a label for each pot, include; pot number, number of mustard seeds and or number of wheat seeds. 3) For each assigned treatment, count out the number of seeds (mustard, wheat or both) needed plus any extra seeds. Since, most likely, only 80-90% of the seeds planted will germinate, the extra seeds will insure that enough plants will germinate for the assigned treatment. 4) Fill a 4 inch pot with artificial soil mixture. Lightly pack the soil down below the rim of the pot. 5) Space the seeds evenly over the soil surface, use the back of a pencil to make a hole to put the seeds, and cover them back up with the soil in the pot. 6) Place pots in a tray, and put under a light source. Leave an empty space between each pot so the plants will have room to grow before they become crowded. Water the plants routinely from either daily to weekly or somewhere in between. 7) Monitor the plants and make observations over the next six weeks. Check back in one week and weed out any extra plants. Carefully remove the entire plant (shoot and root). Make sure both pots for each treatment have the desired number of seedlings for that treatment. ...read more.

Conclusion

Since the graph of interspecific competition on wheat plants had a more negative slope of -.0258, than its intraspecific competition slope of -.0163, means that as the number of competitors increased there was greater decrease in per plant biomass in interspecific competition than intraspecific, so wheat plants are more greatly affected by interspecific competition. Therefore, it can be concluded that these to plant species have very similar resource requirements, and that is why the two species are competing with each other so aggressively, even more intensely than among themselves. 4) From our data, it can be concluded that wheat plants had a stronger more negative effect on the other. Comparing the effect of interspecific competition on wheat and mustard plants, the mustard plants experience a greater decrease in per plant biomass as the number of wheat competitors increased than did the wheat plants as mustard competitors increased, concluding that wheat plants have a greater negative effect on it competitor. The effect of interspecific competition on mustard's graph line of best fit had a slope of -.0353, and the effect of interspecific competition on wheat's graph line of best fit had a slope of -.0250, so clearly mustard plants were influenced more negatively than were wheat plants. 1) ...read more.

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4 star(s)

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Excellent graphical display and analysis of data but a lack of detail and consideration of variables in the method.

Marked by teacher Adam Roberts 26/06/2013

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