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An experiment on the use of Immobilised Glucose Isomerase

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Introduction

An experiment on the use of Immobilised Glucose Isomerase Apparatus: 1) 15g of Fructose 2) 1g of Immobilised Glucose Isomerase 3) 8 Clinistixs' 4) 250 ml beaker 5) Kettle 6) Thermometer 7) 8 test - tubes' 8) Stirring rod 9) 1 pipette 10) 2 syringes Method: Firstly 10 cm � of fructose solution was placed into a test tube with a syringe. Then a clinistix was dipped into the solution for 10 seconds which it was then removed and placed against the standard strip where the colour would be observed. Then 1 gram of the immobilised glucose isomerase was added to the test tube and was incubated in at 65 �c, with occasional stirring. ...read more.

Middle

Then 10cm of distilled water was added to the same test tube, where the test tube was gently mixed with a stirring rod, where then the water was removed. Then a further 10cm of fructose solution was added to the test tube and a test was taken immediately. Then again the test tube was placed into a water bath of 65 �c, where here the test was repeated two times, where the results where recorded. Results: Time Clinistix Colour Is the colour Negative/Positive 0 Pink Negative 5 Dark Purple Positive 10 Navy Blue Positive 0 Pink Negative 5 Dark Purple Positive 10 Navy Blue Positive 0 Pink Negative 5 Navy Blue Positive Conclusion: As enzymes are catalytic molecules they are not directly used up by the process in which they are used. ...read more.

Conclusion

When the enzymes are used in a soluble form they can contaminate the product, and its removal may involve extra purification costs. In order to eliminate wastage and improve productivity the enzyme and product can be separated during the reaction. The enzyme can be imprisoned allowing it to be reused but also preventing contamination of the product - this is known as immobilisation. Unstable enzymes may be immobilised by being attached to or located within an insoluble support, therefore the enzyme is not free in solution. Once attached, an enzyme's stability is increased, possibly because its ability to change shape is reduced. Looking at my results above I can tell that the pattern stayed the same however the last per of results where less time to reach it's maximum colour. ?? ?? ?? ?? ...read more.

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