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An investigation to see how different sugars affect the growth and respiration of yeast.

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Introduction

An investigation to see how different sugars affect the growth and respiration of yeast Introduction The aim of this investigation is to see how different sugars affect the growth and respiration of yeast. I will do two different experiments for the rate of respiration. One will be by using a burette and the other will be using a solution of methylene blue to measure the rate of respiration by analysing if the yeast cells are still active. To see how the different sugars affect the growth of yeast you can do two experiments, using a haemocytometer and a colorimeter. These two pieces of equipment are used to measure the growth of yeast. The different sugars I will be using are Glucose, Sucrose, Fructose and Maltose. From my previous knowledge obtained in AS Level I have found out that Glucose is made by one glucose molecule. This means it is a monosaccharide. Sucrose is a disaccharide which is made from two glucose molecules. Fructose is a monosaccharide which is made from one fructose molecule. Finally, Maltose is a disaccharide which is made up of one glucose and one fructose. Below are the chemical structures of each of the sugars. Glucose Sucrose Maltose Fructose 1-4 linkages (formed by glycosidic bonding) result in a simple linear (end to end) connection, which is found in maltose and sucrose as they are both disaccharide molecules. Prediction I predict that glucose will allow yeast to produce the most respiration. ...read more.

Middle

This was the time taken for the yeast cells to be active and remain active. By taking an average suggests the set of results are more accurate and fewer errors were likely to occur. From analysing the table and graph above, the results prove that my prediction was correct. As of the averages taken, it is proven that glucose made the yeast cells to respire the most and in the quickest time. Respiration- Burette Test Equipment 1x 50ml Burette - to measure the rate of respiration Clamp - to hold the burette on the stand Stand - to hold the burette 1x 100ml Beaker - to fill the burette with water Stop clock - to time how long it takes for the yeast cells to denature Water bath set at 55oC - to heat the yeast cells and activate them 4x 1.0ml Syringes - to insert the methylene blue Water bowl - to contain water whilst using the burette Stopper attached to a rubber tube - this is to collect CO2 in the burette Boiling tubes - to make the sugar and yeast solution Boiling tube rack - to hold the boiling tubes Yeast suspension - to calculate the amount of respiration 0.2M Glucose - the sugar solution which you are checking the respiration rate 0.2M Fructose - the sugar solution which you are checking the respiration rate 0.2M Sucrose - the sugar solution which you are checking the respiration rate Method 1) ...read more.

Conclusion

Rinse the funnel using distilled water of any excess solution 7) Add enough water to make up 500ml in the volumetric flask 8) Pour the distilled water into the beaker 9) Using a pipette make sure that the solution has reached the 500ml level on the meniscus of the volumetric flask 10) Invert the volumetric flask 3 times, to ensure that all the solid particles have dissolved. Calculating the mass of the amount of sugar needed to make 500ml of 0.2M sugar solution Glucose C6H12O6 Fructose C6H12O6 Sucrose C12H24O12 Maltose C12H24O12 Working out the molecular mass for each sugar Glucose and Fructose 6 x 12 =72 6 carbon atoms each having a mass of 12 1 x 12 =12 12 hydrogen atoms each having a mass of 1 16 x 6 =96 6 oxygen atoms each having a mass of 16 180 Sucrose and Maltose 1 x 24 =24 24 hydrogen atoms each having a mass of 1 12 x 12 =144 12 carbon atoms each having a mass of 12 16 x 12 =192 16 oxygen atoms each having a mass of 16 360 0.2M is 1 of the concentration of 1 molar solution of sugar 5 To work out the amount of sugar needed Glucose and Fructose 180 = 36 = 18g 5 2 Sucrose and Maltose 360 = 72 =36g 5 2 The above calculations show that 18g of glucose and fructose is needed to make 0.2 moles of sugar solution in 500ml of water. Therefore 36g of sucrose and maltose is needed to make 0.2 moles of the sugar solution in 500ml of water. ?? ?? ?? ?? 1 Kiran Kaur ...read more.

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***
This investigation is one which should allow an A level candidate to demonstrate a detailed subject knowledge and clear grasp of How Science Works. Unfortunately this author struggled to do this. There is a lack of specific detail and insufficient explanation of why methylene blue is used. There are some factual errors (suggesting a lack of checking) and graphs plotted of all data not just means.

Marked by teacher Adam Roberts 17/09/2013

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