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Animal Research. The dilemma of animal experimentation in fact, each of us is opposed to animal testing. But, similarly, each one of us would like to receive drugs and treatments the best and safest.

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Introduction

Jamie Powers Karen Lopinski April, 19th, 2012 Law Animal Research Introduction The dilemma of animal experimentation in fact, each of us is opposed to animal testing. But, similarly, each one of us would like to receive drugs and treatments the best and safest. However, no animal experiments, it is not possible. In this research paper I will resolve the dilemma of Animal Experimentation. Human beings have an ambiguous attitude towards animals Firstly human cultivated close relations with them, especially with pet's animals, cats or horses, for example. Dogs help blind and are often referred to as man's best friend, cats a home filled with life and lonely, as we know, happiness is on horseback. Human beings often saw their pets as friends and as part of the family. On the other hand, there are some animals called "pension". 3.6 million Pigs, goats, sheep, cattle and horses and 50 million chickens are slaughtered each year. There are research laboratories used to conduct experiments on animals, research takes away animals annually about 500,000 most of them are mice and rats. Whereas slaughtering animals is also a rising issue, human beings slaughter animals for their meat eating it is part of their culture. But some ethicists among them, the American Singer fundamentally reject this aspect because many of us thing that we are not absolutely dependent on animal flesh therefore they prefer vegetable over Animal flesh. ...read more.

Middle

Significant acquisitions could not be obtained from experiments on animals. They typically have been decisive in some fields such as, fundamental processes concerning the operation of the eye for vision, the brain and nerves in the process of thought, antibiotics, diabetes, vaccines against diphtheria, yellow fever and polio, rabies, organ transplantation, research on cancer and many more. (Harnack 1996) Over the past 25 years since the introduction of the Law on the Protection of Animals the field of animal Research has changed dramatically. Not only the number of researches on animals decreased by 75 percent, but the methods of implementation experiences have been refined resulted in less stress for the animals. Several factors were responsible for these improvements in animal testing; a better understanding of the processes employed in human and animal organism has opened new opportunities for researchers to observe some process outside the body using isolated cells, for example. We can now analyze a muscle relaxant drug using isolated muscle cells instead of conducting study on whole animal. It was thus possible to reduce the number of experiments on animals. A change of opinion took place in society in recent decades such as animal now occupies a more prominent place in our society. (Rohr, 1989)Ethical guidelines for animal use were developed in order to avoid unnecessary testing, and pressure from animal advocates has accelerated the introduction of alternative methods and new directions. ...read more.

Conclusion

The pain is also included in research because animal body reacts to pain during the experience, and this reaction may remove any value to the results recorded. Various studies have shown a less pronounced pain leads to a better health of animal, and thus helps in identifying better results. A point has been a long subject of debate, including the transposition to human data from animal experiments. Many experts also agree that good transposition depends on the quality of the experimental protocol. In toxicology, the correlation is about 70 percent. The only correct method would be to conduct these studies in humans. What is forbidden both by common sense that an international convention which was concluded in the wake of the atrocities committed by the Nazis. Conclusion The dilemma of animal experimentation in fact, each of us is opposed to animal testing. To learn understand better about the processes occurring in our body and which are identical in animals. This is especially important for researchers in basic research to identify these components. To discover the causes of disease and treatment options. One speaks in this case applied research, i.e. research that is conducted in the biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies. It is important to conduct the animal research without animal testing; we would still be very far from our current understanding of biology. Over the past 25 years since the introduction of the Law on the Protection of Animals the field of animal Research has changed dramatically. ...read more.

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