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Brief notes on kingdoms of life. There are five kingdoms of life: monera, protista, fungi, plantae, and animalia.

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Introduction

WRITE BRIEF NOTES ON THE KINGDOMS OF LIFE. Living organisms are divided into groups with members that have basic similarities: the broadest divisions are called kingdoms. There are five kingdoms of life: monera, protista, fungi, plantae, and animalia. Every living thing is made up of at least one cell, although some of them are so small that they can only be seen under a microscope. Monera The simplest of organisms are the monera, they are almost all microscopic. This kingdom includes 2 major divisions; the Eubacteria, and the Archaebacteria. ...read more.

Middle

belong to the monera. Protista Protista are much larger than bacteria but are single-celled organisms nonetheless. The major difference between protista and monera is the organisation of the cell. The cells of protista have a separate nucleus and the cytoplasm is much more complicated than that of monerans. Protista are eukaryotes. Most protista can move. Some produce their own food by photosynthesis (like one celled algae), others must ingest other living things. Amoebae, some algae, diatoms and other organisms belong to the protista. Fungi Unlike protists and monerans, fungi are formed from many different cells. ...read more.

Conclusion

Plantae Like fungi, plants are made from many cells. These cells are eukaryotic. The plantae kingdom has more than 300,000 different species. The largest group of plants the angiosperms which are the flowering plants that are multicellular photosynthetic eukaryotes.Plants are living things that don't move, and that produce their own food through photosynthesis hence this make them autothrophs. Plants are generally green, visible to the naked eye, and found in great diversity in many environments on Earth Animalia Animals belong to animalia: multicellular (eukaryotic) organisms that move about and must obtain nutrients by consuming other organisms. Kingdom animalia includes familiar organisms such as mammals, birds, and reptiles, but also less typical things like jellyfish. ?? ?? ?? ?? Gabriel Farrugia Dr. Mark Mifsud ...read more.

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