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Bungee Jumping

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Introduction

Abigail Durling

Bungee Jumping

Bungee jumping originated hundreds of years ago in New Guinea. Men leaped from very tall wooden towers attached to the tower by vines tied to their ankles, it was originally used as a test of courage but has since been converted into a recreational activity and is seen to be a once in a lifetime thrilling experience. The sport is simple yet exciting; jumping from a tall platform i.e. a bridge or a crane whilst attached to a length of elastic chord.

A lot of calculations must be done before a bungee jump to ensure the safety of the jumper. The chord must be exactly the right length to give the best (yet safest) possible experience. If the chord is too short the jumper may not feel the optimum thrill however if the chord is too long it would probably result in the jumper being killed as they would hit the floor (go splat).                                                    I am going to do an experiment in order to find the exact height a fixed weight figure would need to jump from - with a certain length chord - in order to stop them just before they hit the ground.

...read more.

Middle

0.182

4.500image01.png

0.045

0.689

0.693

0.691

0.691

0.191

5.000

0.050

0.717

0.724

0.723

0.721

0.221

5.500

0.055

0.733

0.734

0.736

0.734

0.234

6.000

0.060

0.760

0.764

0.760

0.761

0.261

6.500

0.065

0.794

0.796

0.798

0.796

0.296

7.000

0.070

0.809

0.812

0.810

0.810

0.310

7.500

0.075

0.824

0.830

0.833

0.829

0.329

8.000

0.080

0.859

0.863

0.864

0.862

0.362

8.500

0.085

0.879

0.878

0.879

0.879

0.379

9.000

0.090

0.900

0.901

0.901

0.901

0.401

9.500

0.095

0.924

0.926

0.927

0.926

0.426

10.000

0.100

0.953

0.958

0.958

0.956

0.456

10.500

0.105

0.961

0.962

0.963

0.962

0.462

11.000

0.110

0.976

0.978

0.978

0.977

0.477

11.500

0.115

0.986

0.987

0.987

0.987

0.487

12.000

0.120

1.012

1.013

1.014

1.013

0.513

12.500

0.125

1.026

1.027

1.027

1.027

0.527

13.000

0.130

1.051

1.052

1.053

1.052

0.552

13.500

0.135

1.096

1.096

1.097

1.096

0.596

From this data I could plot a force extension graph.

I then calculated the area under the part of the graph for each mass to get the elastic energy for each unit of force. This elastic energy can then be plotted against extension on the same axis as the graph of image08.pngg=mg(l+x) and hence the extension at which the jumper will come to rest can be found.

Originally the data only went up to 8.000g as I felt this would be an appropriate range of readings with the mass of the Lego figure being in the middle of this range. It turns out that this was not a large enough range as the weights were not being dropped but just allowed to hang in the preliminary experiment. I decided to increase my range to 13.500 to allow for the extra extension of the elastic when the Lego figure is dropped.

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Conclusion

A slightly thicker elastic could have been used to prevent this from happening.

  • Measuring was inaccurate as it was difficult to get the different size loads the same shape meaning you were measuring from a different point for each of the masses.

Modifications

  • If I were to do the experiment again I would consider the effect of different conditions. For example I would repeat the experiment under different temperatures to investigate the elasticity of the chord when it is colder (winter) and warmer (summer).
  • I would take a closer look at the effect of friction, air resistance on the jumper to see if my assumption of it having no major effect on the jumper is true, Internal friction of the chord obviously has some effect on the jumper otherwise they would return to the launch height and bungee jumping would no longer work. Air friction could be made a variable by increasing the weight of the jumper hence making them go faster and increasing air resistance. The internal friction of the chord could be increased by using chords of different thicknesses and elasticity.
  • Another way of looking at this experiment would be to look at the horizontal motion of the jumper, if jumping from a building, are they going to crash into the side of once they have jumped?

...read more.

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