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Changes in Temperature affecting Amylase and Starch

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Introduction

Valentina Zunarelli IB Biology Practical Changes in Temperature affecting Amylase and Starch Aim Testing whether a change in temperature will affect the way amylase, an enzyme, acts upon starch (breaking it down), and finding amylase's optimum temperature. Apparatus � Bunsen Burner � 10ml measuring cylinder � Thermometer � Stop clock � Iodine solution � Starch � Amylase � Spotting tile � Pipettes � Two test tubes � Tongs Method Firstly, fill the spotting tile indents with iodine (about 5 drops) ...read more.

Middle

Keep heating over a bunsen burner holding the test tubes with tongs until the temperature of the solutions is 30?C, use a thermometer to be accurate. Once the temperature has been reached mix the two solutions together by pouring the starch solution in with the amylase (swirl the test tube to make sure the solutions mix). ...read more.

Conclusion

then 50?, 60?, 70?C and lastly 80?C, in order to view the optimum temperature of amylase. All results should be recorded in a table. Variables The only thing that differs with each tes is the temperature to which the solutions are heated. It ranges from 30?C to 80?C. However, the amount of starch (10ml), the amount of amylase (5ml) and the time period for recording (20 seconds) remains the same for all the tests. ...read more.

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