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Cloning has been going on in the natural world for thousands of years.

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Introduction

Cloning Cloning has been going on in the natural world for thousands of years. A clone is simply one living thing made from another, leading to two organisms with the same set of genes. In this sense, identical twins are clones because they have identical DNA. Sometimes, plants are self-pollinated, producing seeds and eventually more plants with the same genetic code. When earthworms are cut in half, they regenerate the missing parts of their bodies, leading to two worms with the same set of genes. Any organism that reproduces asexually produces a clone. However, the ability to intentionally create a clone in the animal kingdom by working on the cellular level is a very recent development. From sheep to monkeys, scientists have made great strides in the past few years in cloning mammals. The birth of these transgender animals provides a major stepping-stone for the cloning of humans (Rantala 26). Now groups say they are ready to clone a human being. Controversy over their plans run high, but scientists believe the technology for human cloning, at least a limited type of cloning for now, is available. A revolution in reproductive biology is now taking place which provides the technical means for cloning humans. ...read more.

Middle

Some gay-rights advocates even argue that should sexual preference prove to have a biological basis, and should genetic screening lead to terminations of hay embryos, homosexuals would have an obligation to produce gay children though cloning. Lesbians would have the chance to give birth with no male involved at all; one woman could contribute the ovum, though other DNA. It might lead to an understanding of the mechanisms by which a morula (a mass of cells that has developed from a blastula attaches itself to the wall of the uterus.) This might generate new, effective contraceptives that exhibit very few side effects. The rapid growth of human morula is similar to the rate at which cancer cells propagate. Cancer researchers believe that if a method is found to stop the division of a human ovum, then a technique for terminating the growth of a cancer might be found (Bosch 1574). Treatments for damage to the brain or nervous system might be possible due to cloning. Damaged nerve tissue in adults does not regenerate. However, stem cells might be capable of repairing the tissue. Because of the large number of stem cells required, human embryo cloning would be required. ...read more.

Conclusion

Obviously a person who cloned and then trained an army of human drones would be acting unethically. However, simply creating another human being through the cloning process does not present an ethical or moral dilemma, assuming that the cloning process produces no abnormalities, but human cloning is not apt to happen soon , if ever. Why not? There is no need to clone humans to provide answers to the questions that are central to research. Human cloning would relate primarily to producing more people. Reproduction by cloning is an inappropriate means to reproduce more mice, monkeys, sheep, or humans because species survive through genetic heterogeneity. Sexual reproduction ensures diversity, where as, in contrast, cloning, asexual reproduction, promotes sameness among individuals. Most of us treasure uniqueness, especially among family and friends, and survival of species (Miller 145). Thus cloning, although a useful tool for experimental biologists is not an appropriate means of reproduction. Efforts to clone humans are not mainstream in the studies of biological research mainly because attempts would be costly and difficult. Human cloning, however, does present a challenge and some people respond to technical challenges. Therefore, it will not be surprising if scientists' actually attempt to clone a human. But he or she will add little or nothing to the welfare of humans by cloning an individual. 1 Stotler ...read more.

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