• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Composition of Hydrates

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Composition of Hydrates Purpose: The purpose of this lab was to determine the percentage of water in a hydrate and to calculate the coefficient of the water of hydration of a hydrate. Data Table: Mass of Crucible & Cover 22.03 g Mass of Crucible & Cover & Hydrate 24.45 g Mass of Crucible & Cover & Anhydrous Salt 23.71 g Analysis: Hydrate Mass (Before Heating): 24.45-22.03 = 2.42 g Anhydrous Salt Left (After Heating): 23.71-22.03 = 1.68 g Water Lost: 24.45-23.71 = .74 g Molar Mass of Hydrate used: CuSO4?5H20 = 63.55+32.07+64+10.10+80 = 249.72 g/mole Molar Mass of Anhydrous Salt: CuSO4 ...read more.

Middle

Regardless of the mass of hydrate, the percentage of water lost stays the same. But, the value is not always the theoretical value, often close; it may vary, depending on the time you have kept the hydrate over the fire. 2) If I used 5 grams of hydrate, I would expect to lose around 36.98% of water. That's about 1.849 grams. Conclusion: The purpose of this lab was to determine the percentage of water in a hydrate and to calculate the coefficient of the water of hydration of a hydrate. ...read more.

Conclusion

This report has shown that regardless of the mass of hydrate, the percentage of water loss stays the same. But, the value is not always the theoretical value; it may vary, depending on the time you have kept the hydrate over the fire. Sometimes you can overheat it and sometimes you can under-heat it. In our case, we under-heated the hydrate. We were aiming to lose 36.98% of water but only 30.58% was evaporated, that is, .74 grams out of 2.42 grams. Throughout the lab, we have faced only a single problem, we have not distributed the hydrate evenly through the crucible, one hydrate was over another hydrate. ?? ?? ?? ?? ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Organic Chemistry section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Organic Chemistry essays

  1. Comprehensive and Detailed Chemistry notes

    Table and outline the relationship between position of elements in the Periodic Table and acidity/basicity of oxides -- Metals of Groups I and II all form basic oxides. The basicity increases down each group -- Most non-metals form acidic oxides.

  2. analysing the unknown compound A

    carboxylic acid as it is an acid and should turn the indicator from yellow to red if it is in the solution. The most important part of this information is that universal indicator can be used as a test for carboxylic acids and if present you will see a colour change from yellow to red.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work