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Dangers of calcium low.

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Dangers of calcium low;

Only 13.5 percent of girls and 36.3 percent of boys age 12 to 19 in the US get the recommended daily amount (RDA) of calcium, placing them at serious risk for osteoporosis and other bone diseases.// Because nearly 90 percent of adult bone mass is established by the end of this age range, the nation's youth stand in the midst of a calcium crisis.

Osteoporosis is a pediatric disease with geriatric consequences. With low calcium intake levels during these important bone growth periods, today's children and teens are certain to face a serious public health problem in the future.

Children are drinking more soft drinks and more non-citrus drinks than they used to; meanwhile, milk consumption has dropped. The number of fractures among children and young adults has increased, probably due to lower intakes of calcium. Pediatricians are also seeing the emergence of rickets, a bone disease that results from low levels of vitamin D.

As these children get older, this calcium crisis will become more serious as the population starts to show its highest rate of osteoporosis and other bone health problems. Getting children to pay attention to their calcium needs is a challenge for scientists and educators.

Salt in the body

The benefits of salt in the body

Sea salt contains about 80 mineral elements that the body needs. Some of these elements are needed in trace amounts. Unrefined sea salt is a better choice of salt than other types of salt on the market. Ordinary table salt that is bought in the super markets has been stripped of its companion elements and contains additive elements such as aluminum silicate to keep it powdery and porous. Aluminum is a very toxic element in our nervous system. It is implicated as one of the primary causes of Alzheimer's disease.

Salt is most effective in stabilizing irregular heartbeats and, Contrary to the misconception that it causes high blood pressure, it is actually essential for the regulation of blood pressure - in conjunction with water. Naturally the proportions are critical. 

Salt is vital to the extraction of excess acidity from the cells in the body, particularly the brain cells.

Salt is vital for balancing the sugar levels in the blood; a needed element in diabetics.

Salt is vital for the generation of hydroelectric energy in cells in the body. It is used for local power generation at the sites of energy need by the cells.

Salt is vital to the nerve cells' communication and information processing all the time that the brain cells work, from the moment of conception to death.

Sodium is the main component of the body's extracellular fluids and it helps carry nutrients into the cells. Sodium also helps regulate other body functions, such as blood pressure and fluid volume, and sodium works on the lining of blood vessels to keep the pressure balance normal. You cannot exist without sodium, but the amount we need is quite small.

The dangers of too much salt

Too much salt causes 'vasoconstriction' of the blood vessels, which means they shrink in size or constrict because the salt has dehydrated the cells, forcing water out of them and making them narrower.

It's this shrinking or tightening of the blood vessels that pose health risks. When blood vessels become narrower, the heart has to work harder to force the blood around the body and this increases the risk of high blood pressure, heart attacks and strokes. If you already have high blood pressure or coronary heart disease (when the arteries become narrowed because fatty deposits have formed on the inside wall of the blood vessels), then you are adding to your risk of having a stroke or heart attack by eating excessive salt.

Salt defiencey

The chemical requirements of the human body demand that the salt concentration in the blood be kept constant. If the body does not get enough salt, a hormonal mechanism compensates by reducing the excretion of salt in the urine and sweat. But it cannot reduce this output to zero. On a completely salt-free diet the body steadily loses small amounts of salt via the kidneys and sweat glands. It then attempts to adjust this by accelerating its secretion of water, so that the blood’s salt concentration can be maintained at the vital level. The result is a gradual desiccation of the body and finally death

Water and salt regulate the water content of the body.

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