• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Determining the force constant

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

A6: Determining the force constant Objective To find out the force constant of a given spring using Hooke's Law. Result hanger and slotted mass (m)/g 20 periods / s one period (T) /s T2 / s2 t1 t2 mean time 39.96 12.07 12.20 12.14 0.61 0.37 50.09 13.82 13.76 13.79 0.69 0.48 60.23 15.30 15.25 15.28 0.76 0.58 70.33 16.52 16.50 16.51 0.83 0.68 80.24 17.60 17.51 17.56 0.88 0.77 90.17 18.30 18.50 18.40 0.92 0.85 100.23 19.57 19.69 19.63 0.98 0.96 Calculation Slope of the best-fit-line: = 9.65 The spring constant (k): K = = 4.089 Discussion Assumptions for the experiment In this experiment, we assume that the spring is weight-less. ...read more.

Middle

Later, we replaced it with another spring with greater extension so we could conduct the experiment more smoothly. We encountered difficulties in counting the number of oscillation because initially the mass was moving up-and-down very fast. Luckily, we came to a solution to count the number of oscillations accurately by counting the number out loud. If the mass of the hanger and slotted masses is too small, the spring cannot show a significant extension and if the mass is too great, the spring might be unable to support it and the slotted masses may fall. ...read more.

Conclusion

The friction acting on the spring and the clamp might affect the result of the experiment. Also, human usually have reaction time so the time that we measured is not hundred percent correct. Moreover, as the slotted masses are not oscillating perpendicularly, the time required to finish one oscillating will be larger. Ways of improvement As the time of 20 oscillations might be affected by human reaction time, we could improve by using data-logger next time so the result obtained could be more accurate. We could also repeat the experiment with counting the time needed for more than 20 oscillations so that we could lower the percentage error caused by inaccurate time recorded. Conclusion The spring constant (k) obtained from the experiment is 4.089. ?? ?? ?? ?? ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Fields & Forces section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Fields & Forces essays

  1. Peer reviewed

    Investigating the forces acting on a trolley on a ramp

    5 star(s)

    For each value of a, to calculate g, we apply the formula; g = a / sin O This gives us 3 values of g, calculate purely without taking friction and other error into account; When O = 10.8�,

  2. Electro motive force Investigation

    Using a signal generator and varying the current passing through the electromagnet respectively could do this. The voltages that the power pack can supply are 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10 and 12 V. The maximum amps that it can go up to is 0.30A, so the exact current measurement

  1. The experiment involves the determination, of the effective mass of a spring (ms) and ...

    xT xT xT 23.34 25.98 25.05 23.33 22.04 28.30 24.65 26.88 0.47 0.65 0.72 0.78 0.88 0.94 0.99 1.08 0.221 0.423 0.518 0.608 0.774 0.889 0.972 1.158 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 21 15 13 13 11 11 10 9 42 30 26 26 22 22 20

  2. Experiment to calculate spring constant of 2 springs

    0.7544 0.7543 0.7544 0.7543 0.7543 0.7544 0.7543 0.7543 Random Uncertainty 1.3x10-5 Average: 0.7543 Mass 2= 0.523828kg Time (s) 1.0317 1.0318 1.0317 1.0319 1.0316 1.0316 1.0314 1.0310 Random Uncertainty 1.1x10-4 Average: 1.0316 Mass 3= 0.775805kg Time (s) 1.2476 1.2477 1.2481 1.2476 1.2468 1.2464 1.2464 1.2461 Random Uncertainty 2.5x10-4 Average: 1.2471 Mass 4= 1.022271kg Time (s)

  1. Measuring The Constant g; The Acceleration Due To Gravity

    8.89 - 0.48 10 - 0.52 9.23 The following table has been made for a graph to demonstrate the linear correlation in my results, with the value for g however remaining constant. 1/2 x (Average Time)( 0.16 0.19 0.21 0.23 0.25 Distance (Metres)

  2. To see how the number of coils on an electromagnet affect its strength.

    The results that were recorded did indeed show a pattern. As the number of coils gradually increased so did the number of paper clips that were attracted. For example, when the coils were turned 20 times, the number of paper clips that were picked was a total of 19.

  1. Force of friction

    The kinetic friction of the blocks in pile and placed side by side were quite similar but of the blocks placed side by side were slightly smaller than another. The results indicated the friction was independent of the contact area.

  2. Physics Spring Coursework

    Hooke s Law states that the extension of a spring is directly proportional to the force applied, provided that the elastic limit of the spring is not exceeded . The formula for this is F=kx, where F=force applied (N), k = spring constant (Nm-1)

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work