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Determining the force constant

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Introduction

A6: Determining the force constant Objective To find out the force constant of a given spring using Hooke's Law. Result hanger and slotted mass (m)/g 20 periods / s one period (T) /s T2 / s2 t1 t2 mean time 39.96 12.07 12.20 12.14 0.61 0.37 50.09 13.82 13.76 13.79 0.69 0.48 60.23 15.30 15.25 15.28 0.76 0.58 70.33 16.52 16.50 16.51 0.83 0.68 80.24 17.60 17.51 17.56 0.88 0.77 90.17 18.30 18.50 18.40 0.92 0.85 100.23 19.57 19.69 19.63 0.98 0.96 Calculation Slope of the best-fit-line: = 9.65 The spring constant (k): K = = 4.089 Discussion Assumptions for the experiment In this experiment, we assume that the spring is weight-less. ...read more.

Middle

Later, we replaced it with another spring with greater extension so we could conduct the experiment more smoothly. We encountered difficulties in counting the number of oscillation because initially the mass was moving up-and-down very fast. Luckily, we came to a solution to count the number of oscillations accurately by counting the number out loud. If the mass of the hanger and slotted masses is too small, the spring cannot show a significant extension and if the mass is too great, the spring might be unable to support it and the slotted masses may fall. ...read more.

Conclusion

The friction acting on the spring and the clamp might affect the result of the experiment. Also, human usually have reaction time so the time that we measured is not hundred percent correct. Moreover, as the slotted masses are not oscillating perpendicularly, the time required to finish one oscillating will be larger. Ways of improvement As the time of 20 oscillations might be affected by human reaction time, we could improve by using data-logger next time so the result obtained could be more accurate. We could also repeat the experiment with counting the time needed for more than 20 oscillations so that we could lower the percentage error caused by inaccurate time recorded. Conclusion The spring constant (k) obtained from the experiment is 4.089. ?? ?? ?? ?? ...read more.

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