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Electro-magnetic Induction.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Ashley Doherty

Electro-magnetic Induction

Plan

During this investigation I shall be looking at electro-magnetic induction. Electro-magnetic induction happens when a magnet is moved in or near a coil. In order for a current to be induced, the coil has to be part of a complete circuit. Even without a complete circuit, a potential difference is still induced across either end of the coil. Moving a magnet into a coil causes a current to be induced in one direction and then moving it back out of the coil induces a current in the opposite direction.

A voltage can only be induced by the movement of the coil in the magnets magnetic field or the movement of a magnetic field round a coil. If there is no movement, then no voltage will be induced.

There are several different input variables that I could change for this experiment, each one having an effect on the induced voltage. These variables are:

  • Strength of the magnet
  • Speed the magnet is moving
  • Number of turns in the coil
  • Area of the cross-section of the coil

The output variable that I am going to measure for the experiment is the voltage that is induced by the input variable.

...read more.

Middle

Connect crocodile clips to either end of the coil.Connect leads to crocodile clips.Plug leads into voltmeter, creating complete circuit.Place foam-filled tub underneath coil.Place the 30cm ruler next to the coil, making sure that it is resting on the table.Take magnet and hold at the top of the ruler with bottom of magnet in line with top of ruler.Drop magnet through the coil.Record the reading on the voltmeter.Repeat five times with each different coil.

Results

I repeated the experiment five times for each different coil and took the average which gave me more accurate results than if I had only done it one for each.

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Conclusion

Evaluation

In my opinion, my method for this investigation worked well, but I feel that there are a few areas that could have been improved.

The most difficult part of the investigation, I felt, to keep reliable was taking the reading on the voltmeter as the magnet passed through the coil. This is because it moved so fast that it was hard to keep track of with my eyes. This may have resulted in some readings being misread. One way of overcoming this problem would be to use a digital voltmeter that clocked the highest reading reached. Another problem with this investigation is dropping the magnet from the same height, as I tended to move the magnet up or down a little by accident and so the magnet was not always dropped from exactly the same height.

Despite these problems I still think that my results are reliable as all my results are pretty similar. Also my results are pretty close to my line of best fit.

...read more.

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