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Electromagnetic Induction

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Introduction

AIM To determine some conditions under which a magnetic effect will produce an electric effect; and to study the factors which affect the induction of a current in a conductor. BACKGROUND INFORMATION Experiments with magnetic fields show that an electric current in a wire has a magnetic field associated with it. If an electric effect can produce a magnetic effect, maybe the reverse may also be true, i.e. ...read more.

Middle

2. The magnet was held stationary in the solenoid. A description of the results was recorded. 3. The N pole was withdrawn from the solenoid and a description was recorded. 4. Steps 1-3 were repeated with different speeds. 5. Steps 1-4 were repeated with a magnet of a different strength. 6. All observations were recorded. RESULTS Motion of magnet Galvanometer needle North pole in Remained at zero Stationary Momentarily moved to right hand side North pole out Momentarily moved to left hand side North pole in Magnitude of induced current (microamperes) ...read more.

Conclusion

The differences in the magnitude of the currents induced were as a direct result of Faraday's law which states that "the induced EMF in a circuit is equal to the rate at which the magnetic flux through the circuit is changing with time". From the analysis of the formula and the law it can be seen that the induced current depends on three things: the number of coils, the relative motion and the magnetic field strength. Thus, the current differences seen in the experiment reflect this law. ...read more.

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