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Esterfication. he purpose of this lab is to achieve a specific odour through the process of esterification where carboxylic acid and alcohol react to produce an ester and water with the assistance of heat and a catalyst such as sulphuric acid.

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Introduction

Esterfication Abstract: Through the process of esterification, carboxylic acid was reacted with an alcohol in order to produce an ester and water as the products. An acid called benzoic acid was reacted with an alcohol identified as ethanol. Through the use of heat and a catalyst, which in this case was sulphuric acid, an ester in the form of ethyl benzoate was produced along with water. The cherry odour comes from the ester called ethyl benzoate. Theory: The purpose of this lab is to achieve a specific odour through the process of esterification where carboxylic acid and alcohol react to produce an ester and water with the assistance of heat and a catalyst such as sulphuric acid. Esters with odours such as banana, cherry, orange, red grape, rum and wintergreen can be formed through this process through the use of a specified alcohol and carboxylic acid. For example, in order to produce ethyl benzoate which is the ester required to receive the cherry odour, the following reaction needs to occur: H2SO4 CH3CH2-OH + C6H5COOH --> C6H5COOC2H5 + H2O benzoic acid ethanol heat ethyl benzoate water In order to verify that an esterification reaction has taken place, there should be a change in solubility, melting point, boiling point and a distinct change in the odour of the substance from the original reactants. ...read more.

Middle

Fill a 500 mL beaker with water to prepare a hot water bath and heat it carefully on a hot plate. In hot water bath remains between 60-65�C use a thermometer. 2. Place 2 dropperfulls of the alcohol and 2 dopperfulls of the carboxylic acid in a clean dry test tube. If the carboxylic acid is a solid, then add enough so that the solid in the test tube is 0.5 cm high. 3. Add 5-10 drops of a concentrated form of H2SO4 to the reactants and gently mix by swirling the test tube. 4. Loosely seal the test tube with a rubber stopper and place it in the hot water bath for about 1--15 minutes. Remove the test tube in turn and carefully waft the vapour towards nose. If the odour cannot be detected, pour a small portion of the content into a beaker of crushed ice by noting the odour of the product. 5. Once ester is produced, the teacher is to evaluate it for the desired odour. 6. Upon completion of the reaction, the contents of the test tube are to be discarded in the container labelled as "Organic Waste" which is kept in the fume hood. ...read more.

Conclusion

For example, Benzyl Acetate is one form of an ester that can be used as to create a perfume scent. Experimental Uncertainties: 1. The rubber stopper does not completely cover the surface of the test tube's mouth making it easy for gas to escape during the heating process. 2. The thermometer has an uncertainty because it was limited to 1�C, preventing an accurate reading from the thermometer in order to determine when the hot water bath has reached a temperature of 60-65�C. The temperature of the hot water bath is also difficult to remain constant since it fluctuates once removed from the hot plate. Conclusion: When the benzoic acid reacts with ethanol it produces an ester called ethyl benzoate and water. This is because in order for esterification to occur, an acid reacts with an alcohol to produce an ester and water through the use of heat and a catalyst such as sulphuric acid in order to speed up the process. In order to determine whether the process is complete factors such as odour, melting point, boiling point and solubility are to change. The odour of the ester has a pleasant smell, a lower melting and boiling point and is insoluble in water due to the fact that it is a non-polar compound. ?? ?? ?? ?? ...read more.

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