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Explain why Berwick and Jedburgh were so different in the ways that they treated their prisoners?

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Introduction

Explain why Berwick and Jedburgh were so different in the ways that they treated their prisoners? (20 marks) Berwick prison and Jedburgh prison were different in many ways, especially in the ways they treated their prisoners. The most obvious difference was the centuries they were built in. Berwick was built in the 18th century in 1750, a time in which no acts or government reforms had been introduced and Jedburgh was built in the 19th century in 1852, the time in which at least 3 government acts (Pophams's acts of 1774, Sir George Paul's act of 1786 and Peel's jail act) were introduced. In the 18th century the government tried to accomidate prisoners in the best way they could so in some cases prisons such as Berwick were not purpose built. Berwick was a town hall which allowed one floor to be occupied for the prisoners.As there was only a small amount of space for the prisoners to be kept, everyone was confined to as little space as possible, some cells accomidating upto 11 prisoners at once. ...read more.

Middle

In Berwick beacause there was little room to seperate the prisoners segregation was not a major issue. There was only enough space in order to segregate the debtors and the felons as in order to segregate all of the prisoners it would take up alot of space, space in which Berwick prison did not have enough of. Because reforming the prisoners was an aim of Jedburgh prison, segregation was a major issue. This was why this prison had to be built so big, so it was able to incorporate the segregation between the debtors, felons,women, men and children, Not only were the debtors and felons separated but the female prisoners and male prisoners were also separated with a wall along the coridoor so no contact could be made. Also the children of the female prisoners were allowed to stay in the same cells as their mothers so that they were separated from the older prisoners.Each prisoner were given their own individual cell to sleep and work in. This was supposed to help in reforming each prisoner so they could sit in solitary confinement a think about the crimes they commited and decide what they will do once they are able to leave prison. ...read more.

Conclusion

If any prisoner broke the silence rule then they would be punished by either flogging (being hit ) or being locked up in a cell in complete darkness for several days. Also each prisoner would wear a hood ova their faces when they were let out of their cells, so that they could not make any communication with the other prisoners.Each prisoner would have a number on their clothing which would be tell each prisoner apart. Another form of dicipline that Jedburgh prison used was the seperate system it was designed to help lead prisoners into moral reflection and redemption. Berwick and Jedburgh prisons were very different in the ways they treated their prisoners this was mostly beacause of the centuries they were built in and the acts that were passed in between when Berwick prison was built and when Jedburgh prison was built. However despite the many differences between the two prison did have a similarity when it came to the segregation of the prisoners. Although Jedburgh prison could segregate its prisoners on a much larger scale than wat Berwick could, Berwick prison was still able to keep its debtors away from the felons. ...read more.

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