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Finding the number of Moles of Magnesium and Oxygen in Magnesium Oxide

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Introduction

Finding the number of Moles of Magnesium and Oxygen in Magnesium Oxide Table of Results: SUBSTANCE MASS/g Before After Crucible + lid 39.48 39.48 Crucible + lid + Magnesium 39.61 N/A Magnesium 0.13 N/A Crucible + lid + Magnesium Oxide N/A 39.63 Magnesium Oxide N/A 0.15 Oxygen N/A 0.02 Calculations for Empirical Formula: 1. Number of moles of Magnesium in Magnesium oxide: Moles/mol = Mass/g ____ Relative atomic mass/ g/mol Moles/mol = __ 0.13g__ = 0.00541 moles ( 3sf) 24g/mol 2. Number of moles of Oxygen in Magnesium oxide: Moles/mol = ____Mass/g______ Relative atomic mass/ g/mol Moles/mol = ___0.02g__ = 0.00125 moles ( 3sf) 16 g/mol 3. Put into ratio: Mg : O 0.00541 : 0.00125 0.00541 = 4.33 0.00125 4.33 : 1 12.99 : 3 13 : 3 Empirical ...read more.

Middle

Furthermore, when we lifted the crucible lid, a significant amount of heat energy was lost to the surrounding environment. This could cause our results to be inaccurate. Additionally, we didn't wait long enough to cool the crucible causing there to be different values in the mass. Since the crucible is made of porcelain, it is a natural conductor. Thermal energy becomes insulated within the crucible producing a slight lifting force. This upward force causes a reduction in the weight of the crucible. Since we didn't wait for an adequate time period, this caused our experiment to be inaccurate. Rogue results and observations: In our experiment there were no rogue results. Since we only did one test this decreased the possibility of getting rogue results. ...read more.

Conclusion

Evaluation of experiment: Overall I felt our experiment went well. Sally and I managed to achieve all our results in a sufficient time period and effectively. Furthermore, we followed all the safety instructions and completed the experiment without any problems. However we could do a number of things to improve our experiment. Firstly we could increase the number of repeats to ensure our results are reliable. Additionally, we could use a more precise balance which read to more decimal places. This would improve our experiment because it would guarantee that the weights of all the substances were precise, therefore minimizing the possible sources of error. Lastly we could decrease the frequency and the time we lifted the crucible lid up for. This would reduce the amount of heat energy lost to the environment, making our results more reliable and accurate. By Ella Morrison 10Y2 ...read more.

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Response to the question

The response to the question is well done. The candidate does not include a method, and the reasons for doing so are discussed below. The calculations made by the candidate are correct, and the further analysis of the experiment in ...

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Response to the question

The response to the question is well done. The candidate does not include a method, and the reasons for doing so are discussed below. The calculations made by the candidate are correct, and the further analysis of the experiment in the evaluation and sources of error sections are done to a very high level because they point out a range of different problems and possible solutions to a few of them.

Level of analysis

No method is included, and this should be included so the candidate can discuss potential things that may have gone wrong in the experiment and that could have been improved. The candidate is consistent in decimal places seen in the table which is essential for accurate calculations. The candidates working out are correct and presented in a clear way with solutions presented in bold which would help anyone marking this piece to look exactly for what they need to mark it. The candidate points out potential problems with the experiment well, but alongside this I would have included potential improvements as this would have indicated a higher level of understanding about the experiment and whilst this is included in the evaluation, to provide this alongside the problem would present better. The observation described is very long winded, and it would be much easier to mark if the candidate presented this in a table, using a description of the strip at the beginning, and then at the end rather than a long drawn out description. The evaluation itself is good, and points to possible improvements to the experiment.

Quality of writing

Minor grammatical errors seen in places. For example in the Rouge results and observations section, 'effected' should be 'affected.' The layout of the analysis of the experiment could be better presented. This is because the titles do not look tidy as they are too long, and the text is quite long-winded and if the information was presented in tables where possible this would look a lot tidier and be easier to read. Other spelling, grammar and punctuation is fine.


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