• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

How long does it take for the action of the enzyme 'amylase' (a type of carbohydrate) to break down the carbohydrate 'starch'?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Enzyme investigation by Alice Turner How long does it take for the action of the enzyme 'amylase' (a type of carbohydrate) to break down the carbohydrate 'starch'? Factors which may affect results: * Increase in temperature could change time taken for starch molecules to be broken up. * Quantity of enzyme: the more enzyme, the faster the starch will be broken up (the quicker the reaction). * Quantity of starch: the larger the quantity of starch, the more time it will take to be broken up. * The amount of times the procedure is repeated, resulting in fairer, more reliable results. Factor to be investigated: The temperature factor will be investigated. ...read more.

Middle

1. enzymes become hot, but no more than 37.5�C. The energised molecules and enzymes move around much faster with heat. 2. the temperature is more than 37.5�C! Procedure Key variable: temperature Measured variable: time taken for starch to be broken down. Controlled variable: quantity Salinity Equipment: 1 x ice bucket Lab temp Water baths (1x 50�C and 1x 60�C) Thermometer Stop watch Pipettes 1 ml Amylase to 5 ml starch Flow chart Attain temp Mix starch any amylase Start watch Every 15secs drop in amylase + starch in iodine Record data When the sample turns from black to transparent, it means that there is no starch left in the solution. (iodine turns black when starch is present) ...read more.

Conclusion

The reason for this amomalous result could be because the temp was not measured every 20 seconds exactly, and the mixture was given a tiny bit more extra time than the others. To test whether this result is really anomalous, the experiment must be repeated. Our main procedural problem was when our first attempt at the experiment failed (using 1ml amylase to 10 ml starch). This was because the starch amount was too much- the more starch, the more time it took for the reaction to occur. To research more in to this topic, other experiments could be done. Such as, does the enzyme reach a point that's so cold it simply won't react with the starch? Or, does the same curve appear in a graph of a different enzyme, such as protease or lipase. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Molecules & Cells section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Here's what a teacher thought of this essay

3 star(s)

***
This is a good overview of the investigation but there are several places where the inclusion of more detail would improve its quality. The author should try to use specific and correct scientific terminology more often.

Marked by teacher Adam Roberts 17/09/2013

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Molecules & Cells essays

  1. Marked by a teacher

    How does the pH affect the activity of amylase

    3 star(s)

    out the investigation fully but as this was the extreme pH value it did not make a big difference on this investigation When looking specifically into the each pH on the graph and its end point we can see that the error bars were quite small so my results were

  2. The Effect Of Temperature On The Action Of Salivary Amylase

    According to this experiment of ours, we can assume that temperature will have its affect on the enzyme activity. On the other hand we can also assume that enzyme activity can be more valuable when it is close to the body temperature.

  1. An experiment to investigate the effect of temperature on the action of the enzyme ...

    As heat does not travel well in water, not all the water become hot, but the part that did became extremely hot and so could have altered the temperature. This would have had an effect on the results obtained. Sadly we did not have enough time to do another test at the same temperature.

  2. Investigation of the effect of adding different concentrations of NaCl to an enzyme-substrate (amylase-starch) ...

    � Stools and bags will be carefully tucked under benches to reduce the chance of tripping up when handling the apparatus; � Work surfaces will be cleared to allow the apparatus to set up appropriately, which in turn will reduce the chance of spillages and breakages; � All apparatus will

  1. An experiment to find of the isotonic point of root vegetables cells in contents ...

    Each time a vegetable cylinder is cut using a size 4 core borer use a small core borer to remove the root vegetable cylinder from the core borer. 3. Using a scalpel you cut the all the root vegetable cylinders to length of 30-millimetres.

  2. Type - 1 Hypersensitivity Reaction

    and H3 and they all elicit a response in many different ways when different substances are introduced to the body. Additionally, H1 antagonist drugs prevent the effects of an agonist, and many H1 receptor antagonists are prescribed clinical drugs used to alleviate symptoms that are involved in allergic reactions (i.e.

  1. The investigation to find the effect of glucose concentration on fermentation of yeast.

    that I took gave me good sets of results that followed a particular trend on the graph. Also the method I have carried out for the experiments I think it is the best way that I could come out with.

  2. How does pH affect the Denaturation of enzymes Starch and Amylase.

    I tried another experiment with just pH 12, and added drops of iodine to it. The pH turned colourless straight away, showing that it was the high pH 12 that was making the iodine colourless, and no other factor. To query about the other levels of pH, I set-up tubes

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work