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I am going to be preparing a slide of an onion piece and looking at it through a microscope in low and high powers. By doing this I expect to accomplish a drawing of an onion cell close up and how to use the assured tools similar to the microscope.

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Introduction

Jetesh Kerai 10T

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Introduction:

I am going to be preparing a slide of an onion piece and looking at it through a microscope in low and high powers. By doing this I expect to accomplish a drawing of an onion cell close up and how to use the assured tools similar to the microscope.

Discussion:

Microscopy is vital for the reason that it allows you to look into certain bits and pieces closely and find out more information about the item. It allows you to glance at many existing cells and other things as well.

History:

In 1665 an Englishman named Robert Hooke cut out some very thin strips of cork and looked at them using a very primitive microscope. What he saw

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Middle

KnifeOnionDissection scissorsFine forcepsWaterPipetteMicroscope slideMicroscopeCover-slipMounted needleIodine solutionFilter paper

Method:

  • I sliced vertically through an onion bulb and detached one of the leaves of the bulb.
  • With a pair off of fine forceps I cautiously peeled off its epidermis, being cautious not to separate the cells from the layer beneath.
  • Using a razor-sharp pair of dissection scissors I cut out a piece of epidermis about 5mm by 5mm.
  • Using a pipette I carefully placed a drop of water on a clean microscope slide.
  • I carefully placed the epidermis in the drop of water ensuring that it was flat, using a mounted needle if necessary.
  • I positioned a cover slip on top of the epidermis, again making sure that it was kept flat.
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Conclusion

Results:

Discussion of Vocational Implications:

Two differences between school microscopy and microscopy in the industry is that in school we use light microscopes that need light to obtain the image by reflecting off the mirror and have. In industry however scientists use electron microscopes. Another difference is that scientists have microscopes with more magnifications so they can look deeper into the cell. In school the microscopes used have not got the ability to magnify over 40x (10x4=400). One similarity is that the same method is used. We put the tissue to be examined on the slide and examine it looking through different magnifications. Another similarity is that scientists look at the same things we do in school such as onion slides and other tissues.  

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