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In this experiment, I am going to find out the relationship between Force and extension using stretchy sweets and then find the stiffness of stretchy sweets using Hookes Law.

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Introduction

STRETCHY SWEETS EXPERIMENT In this experiment, I am going to find out the relationship between Force and extension using stretchy sweets and then find the stiffness of stretchy sweets using Hookes Law. Hookes Law states that extension in a material is proportional to the force applied provided the proportional limit is not exceeded. To do this, I will use a fixed length of stretchy sweets and suspend different mass of metals on it. Then I will find the extension on the sweet for each suspended metal of known mass. I will carry out first a trial experiment to find out the behaviour of this sweet under different load and to see if it returns to its original length after unloading it. There are several factors that may affect the extension of the stretchy sweet. Some of them are: * The material of the stretchy sweet * The cross sectional area of the sweet * The length of the stretchy sweet * The temperature in the lab In doing this, I have to keep the material of the sweet constant by using the same type of sweet each time. The cross sectional area of the stretchy sweets will be kept constant by using stretchy sweets with the same diameter. The temperature will be kept constant by performing the experiment in the lab at room temperature, because an increase or decrease in temperature will ...read more.

Middle

SAFETY: - To ensure that the experiment is safe, I will put a block of polystyrene beneath the metre rule to act as cushion to prevent injuries when the load disengages itself. I will handle all heavy load with care as I move them about. OBSERVING AND RECORDING I performed the experiment as planned and was able to get the following results. For the experiment result when I applied different load using stretchy sweet of length 44.5cm and cross sectional area 8.25X 10-7m2. Mass in g �0.1 Weight/load in N Initial length of sweet in m New length of sweet in m Extension of sweet in m Average extension in m 10.0 0.100 0.445 0.449 0.544 0.548 0.089 0.099 0.094 20.5 0.205 0.470 0.490 0.677 0.699 0.207 0.209 0.208 25.5 0.255 0.465 0.499 0.703 0.739 0.238 0.240 0.239 40.5 0.405 0.444 0.617 0.724 0.898 0.280 0.281 0.281 50.8 0.508 0.502 0.550 0.785 0.834 0.283 0.284 0.284 Table of result for force/load and extension Force/load in N Extension in m 0.100 0.094 0.205 0.208 0.255 0.239 0.405 0.281 0.508 0.284 For the experiment result using stretchy sweet of length 44.5cm and cross sectional area 2.66X 10-6m2, when I suspended different load. Mass in g �0.1 Weight/load in N Initial length of sweet in m New length of sweet in m Extension of sweet in m Average extension in m 12.0 0.120 0.402 0.404 0.462 ...read more.

Conclusion

The stretchy sweet at this point can be said to be exhibiting plastic behaviour as a small increase in the applied force resulted in very large extensions. Overall, I don't think my results were accurate and I don't seem to understand what happened in the graph for my trial experiments. There were still errors encountered with my refined method in taking down my extension readings after applying the load and timing for 1 minute, as it was impossible to take off the load and at the same time, take my readings without the sweet recoiling itself again. Holding it with your hand does result in an increase in the force applied to the stretchy sweet. There were also errors encountered when the stretchy sweets sagged as the load was applied to it. The only way I can make my results more reliable will be to use a different method. I will suspend two strips of the same stretchy sweet from a beam clamped. And on one strip, I will put a millimetre scale while on the other; I will put a vernier scale for reading small extensions. I will also keep the strand with the millimetre scale taut by putting a fixed weight on it. To eliminate any sag of the beam. The reason why I will suspend two strips of the same stretchy sweet is to eliminate error due to temperature changes while performing the experiment. 1 ...read more.

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