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In this experiment, we investigated the relationship between the difference in work and mechanical advantage. Furthermore, we wanted to determine the difference between total work done lifting a 1kg mass up a height

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Introduction

The Relationship between Changes of Mechanical Advantage and Work Done

Abstract (Moe Okubo)

        In this experiment, we investigated the relationship between the difference in work and mechanical advantage. Furthermore, we wanted to determine the difference between total work done lifting a 1kg mass up a height and dragging up a ramp as a function of mechanical advantage. We planned to change the height each times with pile-upped books and change the angles. Firstly, we measure the height of the books we piled up, the length. Then measure the angle of the ramp and we use a plank, and a spring balance to lift up and drag up the mass we repeat these steps for five times. In the result, when we changed height the work of lifting up the mass would not change but the work of dragging up the ramp would affect and we could see that when the angle of the ramp changed, work of dragging up would use more work. Also we could see that the mechanical advantage would affect too, it has getting less act when the angle of the ramp going bigger.

Abstract (Eric Liu)

Basically, in this lab we’re going to determine the difference between total work done lifting a 1kg mass directly up a height h and dragging a 1kg mass up a ramp of length l as a function of mechanical advantage.

...read more.

Middle

-1 ruler

- 2~6 textbooks

-1 balance scale

-1 plank

-1 protractor

Methods

1. Use a board, and some textbooks to make a ramp.

2. Measure the degree and height of the ramp.

3. Put the plank to balance scale.

4. Measure the force for height and length of the ramp.

5. Calculate the mechanical advantage (MA).

Result

lcm*hcm

degree

Workh

Workl

Δ(Workh-Workl)

MA=l/h

100cm*14.5cm

10゜

10N

4N

Δ(10N-4N)=6N

≈6.9

100cm*18cm

20゜

10N

5N

Δ(10N-5N)=5N

≈5.6

100cm*21cm

25゜

10N

5.3N

Δ(10N-5.3N)=4.7N

≈4.8

100cm*24cm

29゜

10N

6N

Δ(10N-6N)=4N

≈4.2

100cm*27cm

30゜

10N

6.3N

Δ(10N-6.3N)=3.7N

≈3.7

-100cm*14.5cm: 10゜

...read more.

Conclusion

        We need to cooperate more during experiments to get the widest range of view and we could make more drastic changes to the experiment. Changes such as adding more than a one kilogram load would help us see clearer differences when doing our experiment.

        This experiment teaches us that by using the simple machine, ramp, we can reduce the effort used to lift the load up horizontally. The ramp lets us use less effort to move the load up a certain height we want. We learned that the higher the angle of the ramp is, the more effort you would need to pull the load up the ramp. This is similar to running up the slope, the steeper the slope is, and the harder you would have to run just to keep your pace.

Works Cited

Henderson, Tom. “Inclined Planes.” 11th September 2009. The Physics Classroom Tutorials.  1996. <http://www.glenbrook.k12.il.us/gbssci/phys/Class/vectors/u3l3e.html>

Mifflin, Houghton. “Work.” 13th September 2009. Dictionary Reference. 2009. < http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/work >

Ostdiek, Vern. “Inclined Plane.” 13th September 2009. Wikipedia. 2005. < http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inclined_plane >

...read more.

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