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Investigate the effects of how springs and elastic bands stretch when weights are hung on them and how springs and elastic bands stretch when the weights are unloaded.

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Introduction

Physics Investigation into the stretching of springs and elastic bands

Aim: To investigate the effects of how springs and elastic bands stretch when weights are hung on them and how springs and elastic bands stretch when the weights are unloaded for example:

  • 100g
  • 200g
  • 300g
  • 400g
  • 500g
  • 400g
  • 300g
  • 200g
  • 100g

Prediction:

(100g=1n Newton)The inventor Robert Hooke discovered that the amount an elastic body stretches out of shape is in direct proportion to the force acting on it. This is known as Hooke’s law.

 I predict that as long as the force is not too large, stretching the spring past its limit of elasticity, the spring will go back to its original length when the force is removed. I think this because I don’t think that the 500g weight will make the spring go past its limit of elasticity. I also predict that the more the weight the further the spring will go from its starting point.

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Middle

Average result

100g

4

4

4.5

4.2cm

200g

8.5

8

8.5

8.3cm

300g

12.5

13

12.5

12cm

400g

16.5

16.5

17

16.6cm

500g

21

20.5

21

20.8cm

400g

16

16.5

16.7

16.4cm

300g

12.5

12.5

13

12.cm

200g

8

8

8

8cm

100g

4.5

4.3

4.4

4.4cm

Graph of spring investigation (hand drawn and computed graph)

image00.png

image01.png

Diagram of apparatus used for elastic band investigation:

Result of elastic band investigation:

Weight 1g=1N

1

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Conclusion

   The second half of the elastic band graph shows basically the same results of the spring graph, but as I predicted the unloading was different to the loading up of the weights. The unloading gave higher results of the cm stretched unloading than when it was loaded up. This is because I believe that hysteresis has occurred.

Conclusion:

   I believe that this experiment was successful in both proving my predictions to be correct and also to show the occurrence of hysteresis. I think that the results show clearly what I had predicted. I believe that these results are correct, because I made three results and averaged them; also there were no anomalous results. These results were also consistent.

   Although this experiment may not have given precise results because the measuring equipment, I believe that if I had better measuring equipment than the results shown may have been more precise. But I still believe that the overall results would prove my prediction correct.

   To extend this experiment I could have done the unloading for the spring as well as the elastic band to see if hysteresis would be shown.

...read more.

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